Charting the hidden City: Collecting prison social network data

Corey Whichard, David R. Schaefer, Derek A. Kreager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Penologists have long emphasized the importance of studying social relationships among prisoners to understand how people adapt to confinement. While several penological traditions clearly implicate social networks as an explanatory mechanism, network methods have rarely been applied in prison research. We suspect that prison scholars have been slow to incorporate social networks into their research because of the challenges—both real and perceived—of collecting social network data in the prison setting. In this article, we argue that successfully collecting network data from prisoners can be achieved by carefully adapting methods to the peculiarities and constraints of the prison setting. We draw upon experiences from the Prison Inmate Networks Study (PINS) and its associated projects in five Pennsylvania prisons to construct a framework for understanding and overcoming the obstacles to network data collection in prisons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSocial Networks
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Prisons
Social Support
correctional institution
social network
Prisoners
prisoner
data network
Research
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Charting the hidden City : Collecting prison social network data. / Whichard, Corey; Schaefer, David R.; Kreager, Derek A.

In: Social Networks, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Schaefer, David R.

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