Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes

Marge Condrasky, Jenny H. Ledikwe, Julie E. Flood, Barbara Jean Rolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. Research Methods and Procedures: A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Results: Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Discussion: Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2086-2094
Number of pages9
JournalObesity
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

Fingerprint

Portion Size
Restaurants
Food
Serving Size
Weights and Measures
Information Management
Energy Intake
Body Weight
Economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Condrasky, M., Ledikwe, J. H., Flood, J. E., & Rolls, B. J. (2007). Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes. Obesity, 15(8), 2086-2094. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.248
Condrasky, Marge ; Ledikwe, Jenny H. ; Flood, Julie E. ; Rolls, Barbara Jean. / Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes. In: Obesity. 2007 ; Vol. 15, No. 8. pp. 2086-2094.
@article{8a58b91c55b44047b74aca50fed2b486,
title = "Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes",
abstract = "Objectives: The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. Research Methods and Procedures: A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Results: Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76{\%} of chefs thought that they served {"}regular{"} portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Discussion: Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.",
author = "Marge Condrasky and Ledikwe, {Jenny H.} and Flood, {Julie E.} and Rolls, {Barbara Jean}",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/oby.2007.248",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "2086--2094",
journal = "Obesity",
issn = "1930-7381",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "8",

}

Condrasky, M, Ledikwe, JH, Flood, JE & Rolls, BJ 2007, 'Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes', Obesity, vol. 15, no. 8, pp. 2086-2094. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.248

Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes. / Condrasky, Marge; Ledikwe, Jenny H.; Flood, Julie E.; Rolls, Barbara Jean.

In: Obesity, Vol. 15, No. 8, 01.08.2007, p. 2086-2094.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes

AU - Condrasky, Marge

AU - Ledikwe, Jenny H.

AU - Flood, Julie E.

AU - Rolls, Barbara Jean

PY - 2007/8/1

Y1 - 2007/8/1

N2 - Objectives: The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. Research Methods and Procedures: A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Results: Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Discussion: Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

AB - Objectives: The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. Research Methods and Procedures: A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Results: Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Discussion: Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548634031&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548634031&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/oby.2007.248

DO - 10.1038/oby.2007.248

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 2086

EP - 2094

JO - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1930-7381

IS - 8

ER -

Condrasky M, Ledikwe JH, Flood JE, Rolls BJ. Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes. Obesity. 2007 Aug 1;15(8):2086-2094. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.248