Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months

Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress

R. M.Pasco Fearon, David Reiss, Leslie D. Leve, Daniel S. Shaw, Laura V. Scaramella, Jody M. Ganiban, Jenae Marie Neiderhiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume760
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2014

Fingerprint

Mothers
Parturition
Genes
Psychopathology
Social Adjustment
Affective Symptoms
Mental Disorders
Self Report
Psychiatry
Parents
Prospective Studies
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Fearon, R. M.Pasco ; Reiss, David ; Leve, Leslie D. ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Scaramella, Laura V. ; Ganiban, Jody M. ; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie. / Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months : Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress. In: Development and Psychopathology. 2014 ; Vol. 760.
@article{fdddf74d2aaa44c3a3176bb3be703bd0,
title = "Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months: Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress",
abstract = "Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development.",
author = "Fearon, {R. M.Pasco} and David Reiss and Leve, {Leslie D.} and Shaw, {Daniel S.} and Scaramella, {Laura V.} and Ganiban, {Jody M.} and Neiderhiser, {Jenae Marie}",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1017/S0954579414000868",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "760",
journal = "Development and Psychopathology",
issn = "0954-5794",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months : Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress. / Fearon, R. M.Pasco; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 760, 15.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months

T2 - Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress

AU - Fearon, R. M.Pasco

AU - Reiss, David

AU - Leve, Leslie D.

AU - Shaw, Daniel S.

AU - Scaramella, Laura V.

AU - Ganiban, Jody M.

AU - Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie

PY - 2014/9/15

Y1 - 2014/9/15

N2 - Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development.

AB - Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84910641348&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84910641348&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0954579414000868

DO - 10.1017/S0954579414000868

M3 - Article

VL - 760

JO - Development and Psychopathology

JF - Development and Psychopathology

SN - 0954-5794

ER -