Child protective service disparities and serious mental illnesses: Results from a national survey

Katy Kaplan, Eugene Brusilovskiy, Amber O'Shea, Mark S. Salzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Involvement with child protective services (CPS) can have detrimental effects on children and parents alike. This study provided updated information about the prevalence of parenting among individuals with a serious mental illness and established the first contemporaneous and comparative national prevalence estimates of CPS involvement for parents with and without a serious mental illness. Methods: Data came from the Truven Health Analytics PULSE national survey of 42,761 adults conducted between September 2014 and December 2015. Survey questions assessed the presence of a serious mental illness, parenting status, contact with CPS, and types of CPS involvement. Results: Prevalence of parenthood was similar between individuals with (69%) and without (71%) a serious mental illness. Parents with a serious mental illness were approximately eight times more likely to have CPS contact and 26 times more likely to have a change in living arrangements compared with parents without a serious mental illness. Even when the analysis was limited to parents who had CPS contact, parents with a serious mental illness were at greater risk of custody loss compared with parents without mental illness. Conclusions: These results further heighten the need to attend to parenting among individuals with a serious mental illness and better understand the factors associated with CPS involvement to reduce the identified disparities between parents with and without a mental illness. Efforts to reduce CPS involvement would likely reduce stress and enhance recovery and mental health for parents and their children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-208
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Parents
Parenting
Child Protective Services
Surveys and Questionnaires
Mental Health
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kaplan, Katy ; Brusilovskiy, Eugene ; O'Shea, Amber ; Salzer, Mark S. / Child protective service disparities and serious mental illnesses : Results from a national survey. In: Psychiatric Services. 2019 ; Vol. 70, No. 3. pp. 202-208.
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Child protective service disparities and serious mental illnesses : Results from a national survey. / Kaplan, Katy; Brusilovskiy, Eugene; O'Shea, Amber; Salzer, Mark S.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 70, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 202-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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