Childbirth pain, attachment orientations, and romantic partner support during labor and delivery

Carol L. Wilson, Jeffry A. Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Attachment anxiety is associated with greater perceived physical pain, whereas social support is associated with lower pain perceptions. Few studies, however, have examined the joint effects of attachment and support on acute physical pain in a dyadic context. In this study, first-time expectant mothers (N = 140) and their male partners completed romantic attachment measures (prenatally) and postnatal assessments of women's pain and men's emotional support during labor and delivery. More securely attached women benefited from emotional support in terms of reduced pain, more avoidantly attached women reported greater pain when given more support, and more anxiously attached women reported greater pain, regardless of their partners' support. These results advance our understanding of which women are most vulnerable to painful childbirth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-644
Number of pages23
JournalPersonal Relationships
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

pain
Parturition
labor
Pain
Pain Perception
expectant mother
Acute Pain
Pain Measurement
Social Support
Anxiety
Mothers
social support
anxiety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Wilson, Carol L. ; Simpson, Jeffry A. / Childbirth pain, attachment orientations, and romantic partner support during labor and delivery. In: Personal Relationships. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 622-644.
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Childbirth pain, attachment orientations, and romantic partner support during labor and delivery. / Wilson, Carol L.; Simpson, Jeffry A.

In: Personal Relationships, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 622-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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