Childhood risk factors for persistence of violence in the transition to adulthood: A social development perspective

R. Kosterman, J. W. Graham, J. D. Hawkins, R. F. Catalano, T. I. Herrenkohl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined violent behavior from ages 13 to 21 and identified predictors at age 10. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of developmental patterns of violence. The sample is from a study of 808 youth interviewed annually from age 10 to 16 years, and again at ages 18 and 21. Over 28% of the youth in the sample reported nonviolence throughout adolescence and into early adulthood. Most youth (55%) engaged in violence in adolescence but desisted from violence in early adulthood, while 16% persisted in violent behavior at age 21. Violence in adolescence was best predicted by male gender, Asian American ethnicity (a protective factor), childhood fighting, early individual characteristics, and early antisocial influences. Adult persistence of violence was best predicted by male gender, early school achievement (which was protective), and early antisocial influences. Early prosocial development was also protective against violence persistence for females. Implications for prevention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-369
Number of pages15
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume16
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 23 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

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    Kosterman, R., Graham, J. W., Hawkins, J. D., Catalano, R. F., & Herrenkohl, T. I. (2001). Childhood risk factors for persistence of violence in the transition to adulthood: A social development perspective. Violence and Victims, 16(4), 355-369.