Children choose their own stories: The impact of choice on children's learning of new narrative skills

Kiren Khan, Keith Nelson, Elisabeth Whyte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite evidence that early narrative abilities are predictive of literacy skills and academic achievement, only limited progress has been made in understanding how the development of these narrative skills can be facilitated. The current study measured the effectiveness of a new narrative intervention conducted with 26 preschoolers. Children were assigned to one of two intervention conditions: An active-choice condition (able to choose story components) or a no-choice condition (story components were preselected). Both groups otherwise received the same explicit and engaging teaching of story grammar. As predicted, greater narrative skill gains were evident for the active-choice intervention; including larger gains on both central story grammar components and story information overall. Future implications for how stories might be presented to young children in order to more richly facilitate narrative skill acquisition are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-962
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of child language
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Psychology(all)

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