China of the American imagination

The influence of trade on US portrayals of China, 1820 to 1850

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In the 1830s, a young girl named Caroline Howard King made numerous visits to the East India Marine Society in Salem, Massachusetts. Since Salem was a thriving center of maritime commerce, ships departed daily for destinations all over the world. When sea captains returned home bearing artifacts, they deposited these in the Society's museum-East India Marine Hall. The collection was especially strong in artifacts from China, India, the East Indies, and the Pacific Islands. The hall provided visitors with an intriguing way to experience Asia without venturing far from home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNarratives of Free Trade and the Commercial Cultures of Early American Chinese Relations
PublisherHong Kong University Press, HKU
Pages57-82
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9789888083534
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

Portrayal
India
China
Artifact
Asia
Pacific Islands
Commerce
1830s
Ship

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Haddad, J. R. (2011). China of the American imagination: The influence of trade on US portrayals of China, 1820 to 1850. In Narratives of Free Trade and the Commercial Cultures of Early American Chinese Relations (pp. 57-82). Hong Kong University Press, HKU.
Haddad, John Rogers. / China of the American imagination : The influence of trade on US portrayals of China, 1820 to 1850. Narratives of Free Trade and the Commercial Cultures of Early American Chinese Relations. Hong Kong University Press, HKU, 2011. pp. 57-82
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Haddad, JR 2011, China of the American imagination: The influence of trade on US portrayals of China, 1820 to 1850. in Narratives of Free Trade and the Commercial Cultures of Early American Chinese Relations. Hong Kong University Press, HKU, pp. 57-82.

China of the American imagination : The influence of trade on US portrayals of China, 1820 to 1850. / Haddad, John Rogers.

Narratives of Free Trade and the Commercial Cultures of Early American Chinese Relations. Hong Kong University Press, HKU, 2011. p. 57-82.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Haddad JR. China of the American imagination: The influence of trade on US portrayals of China, 1820 to 1850. In Narratives of Free Trade and the Commercial Cultures of Early American Chinese Relations. Hong Kong University Press, HKU. 2011. p. 57-82