Choice of Corticosteroid Solution and Outcome After Injection for Trigger Finger

John M. Roberts, Brittany J. Behar, Laila M. Siddique, Morgan S. Brgoch, Kenneth F. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Many techniques for injection of trigger fingers exist. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of steroid or technique used for trigger finger injection altered clinical outcomes. Methods: Six hand surgeons at a single institution were surveyed regarding their injection technique, preferred steroid used, and protocol for repeat injection or indication for surgery for symptomatic trigger finger. A retrospective chart review of patients who underwent trigger finger injections was performed by randomly selecting 35 patients for each surgeon between January 2013 and December 2015. Demographic data at the time of presentation were collected. Outcome data during follow-up appointments were also recorded. Results: A total of 210 patient charts were reviewed. Demographic data and initial presenting grade of triggering were similar among all groups. There was no significant difference in clinical course or eventual outcomes noted with injection technique. There were 70 patients in each steroid cohort. Patients receiving triamcinolone required additional injections compared with those receiving methylprednisolone and dexamethasone. Eventual surgical intervention was significantly higher in those patients receiving methylprednisolone. The methylprednisolone group also underwent operative release significantly earlier. Conclusions: Trigger finger injections with triamcinolone demonstrate a higher rate of additional injections when compared with dexamethasone and methylprednisolone. Patients who underwent methylprednisolone injection had surgical release performed earlier and more frequently than the other 2 groups. The choice of corticosteroid significantly affected clinical outcome in this study population. Clinicians performing steroid injections for trigger finger may wish to consider these results when selecting a specific agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHand
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Fingers
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Injections
Methylprednisolone
Steroids
Triamcinolone
Dexamethasone
Demography
Appointments and Schedules
Hand
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Roberts, John M. ; Behar, Brittany J. ; Siddique, Laila M. ; Brgoch, Morgan S. ; Taylor, Kenneth F. / Choice of Corticosteroid Solution and Outcome After Injection for Trigger Finger. In: Hand. 2019.
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abstract = "Background: Many techniques for injection of trigger fingers exist. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of steroid or technique used for trigger finger injection altered clinical outcomes. Methods: Six hand surgeons at a single institution were surveyed regarding their injection technique, preferred steroid used, and protocol for repeat injection or indication for surgery for symptomatic trigger finger. A retrospective chart review of patients who underwent trigger finger injections was performed by randomly selecting 35 patients for each surgeon between January 2013 and December 2015. Demographic data at the time of presentation were collected. Outcome data during follow-up appointments were also recorded. Results: A total of 210 patient charts were reviewed. Demographic data and initial presenting grade of triggering were similar among all groups. There was no significant difference in clinical course or eventual outcomes noted with injection technique. There were 70 patients in each steroid cohort. Patients receiving triamcinolone required additional injections compared with those receiving methylprednisolone and dexamethasone. Eventual surgical intervention was significantly higher in those patients receiving methylprednisolone. The methylprednisolone group also underwent operative release significantly earlier. Conclusions: Trigger finger injections with triamcinolone demonstrate a higher rate of additional injections when compared with dexamethasone and methylprednisolone. Patients who underwent methylprednisolone injection had surgical release performed earlier and more frequently than the other 2 groups. The choice of corticosteroid significantly affected clinical outcome in this study population. Clinicians performing steroid injections for trigger finger may wish to consider these results when selecting a specific agent.",
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Choice of Corticosteroid Solution and Outcome After Injection for Trigger Finger. / Roberts, John M.; Behar, Brittany J.; Siddique, Laila M.; Brgoch, Morgan S.; Taylor, Kenneth F.

In: Hand, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Taylor, Kenneth F.

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