Cholesterol, GM1, and autism

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disruption of cholesterol metabolism has been hypothesized to contribute to dementia, possibly due to its role in maintaining membrane fluidity as well as the integrity of lipid rafts. Previously, we reported an apparent inverse relationship between membrane cholesterol levels and those of GM1, another lipid that can be found in rafts. This paper describes the observation that red blood cell (RBC) membranes isolated from blood drawn from children diagnosed with autism have on the average significantly less cholesterol and significantly more GM1 than RBC membranes isolated from blood obtained from control children. While cholesterol in the circulation does not cross the blood brain barrier, a generalized defect in its synthesis could affect its concentration in the central nervous system and that, coupled with a change in ganglioside expression, could contribute to development of the behaviors associated with autism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1201-1207
Number of pages7
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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Autistic Disorder
Blood
Cholesterol
Cell membranes
Erythrocytes
Cell Membrane
Membranes
Lipids
Membrane Fluidity
Fluidity
Gangliosides
Neurology
Blood-Brain Barrier
Metabolism
Dementia
Central Nervous System
Defects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Schengrund, Cara Lynne ; Ali-Rahmani, Fatima ; Ramer, Jeanette C. / Cholesterol, GM1, and autism. In: Neurochemical Research. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 1201-1207.
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Cholesterol, GM1, and autism. / Schengrund, Cara Lynne; Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Ramer, Jeanette C.

In: Neurochemical Research, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.06.2012, p. 1201-1207.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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