Chronic morphine treatment exaggerates the suppressive effects of sucrose and cocaine, but not lithium chloride, on saccharin intake in Sprague-Dawley rats

Patricia S. Grigson, Robert A. Wheeler, Daniel S. Wheeler, Sarah M. Ballard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three experiments examined the effect of chronic morphine treatment on cocaine-, sucrose-, and lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced suppression of saccharin intake in Sprague-Dawley rats. All rats were either water- or food-deprived and then implanted subcutaneously with 1 morphine (75 mg) or vehicle pellet for 5 days. They were then given brief access to 0.15% saccharin and soon thereafter injected with either cocaine (10 mg/kg sc), LiCl (0.009 M, 1.33 ml/100 g body weight ip), or saline, or, in Experiment 2, given a 2nd access period to either a preferred 1.0 M sucrose solution or the same 0.15% saccharin solution. There was 1 taste-drug or taste-taste pairing per day for a number of days. The results showed that a history of chronic morphine treatment exaggerated the suppressive effects of a rewarding sucrose solution and cocaine but not those of the aversive agent, LiCl. These data provide further support for the reward comparison hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-416
Number of pages14
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume115
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chronic morphine treatment exaggerates the suppressive effects of sucrose and cocaine, but not lithium chloride, on saccharin intake in Sprague-Dawley rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this