Cigarette smoking among youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Clinical phenomenology, comorbidity, and genetics

Kenneth P. Tercyak, Beth N. Peshkin, Leslie R. Walker, Mark A. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cigarette smoking and other forms of tobacco use among children and adolescents is a significant public health concern. The negative consequences of prolonged exposure to such substances are numerous, and include higher prevalence rates of cardiopulmonary dysfunction and certain cancers, and may lead to other forms of drug use. Identifying subgroups of youth who may be at greater risk than others to develop a nicotine habit is an important step forward in preventing smoking initiation, and controlling tobacco use. One such subgroup is children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This is because the prevalence of smoking among these youngsters is nearly twice as high as it is among those who are unaffected with ADHD. However, the etiology of this association is not known. It is possible that a constellation of social, behavioral, and biological factors influences this process, resulting in higher prevalence rates. To further our understanding of this problem, we reviewed each of these factors in relationship to smoking and to ADHD. Using the primary care population as a model, we then discuss clinical research methods that may shed additional light on this topic, as well as the strengths and limitations of current smoking prevention and cessation options for ADHD-affected youth who are assessed and treated in medical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-50
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 6 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology

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