Cigarette smoking and alcohol use as predictors of HIV testing in the United States: Results from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey

Donaldson Conserve, Gary King, Angela Turo, Edith Wafula, Luis Sevilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the association between HIV risk perception and HIV testing among cigarette smokers, alcohol users, dual consumers of cigarette and alcohol, and abstainers. Data were analyzed from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey of the full sample of 22,946 and separately for 1547 African Americans. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that alcohol users and dual consumers were significantly more likely to perceive themselves to be at risk of acquiring HIV. Cigarette smokers and alcohol users who considered themselves to be at risk for HIV and dual consumers who reported no perceived HIV risk were more likely to have been tested for HIV than abstainers who perceived no risk of acquiring HIV. Among African Americans, dual consumers and cigarette smokers only who perceived themselves at risk for HIV were more likely to have been tested for HIV than abstainers who perceived no risk of HIV infection. This study demonstrated that among the full sample and African Americans, cigarette smoking and alcohol use were significantly associated with HIV testing regardless of HIV risk perceptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-849
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cigarette smoking and alcohol use as predictors of HIV testing in the United States: Results from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this