Class, gender, and the family unit

A dynamic model of stratification and class politics

Eric Plutzer, John F. Zipp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most controversial issues in the literature on class and gender has been how to understand the class positions of dual earner couples. However, a central issue in this debate is, in fact, not testable using typical sample surveys: there is no way to assess if spouses who have different objective class positions also have different subjective class affinities. We use a large sample of British dual earner couples to address this for the first time. Based on our analysis, we have six conclusions: (1) Most couples agree on their class identification and on class politics; (2) this family class effect is not due to common consumption patterns; (3) cross-class couples disagree no more often than same-class couples, undermining the individualistic perspective; (4) husbands are more influenced by their wives' class of origin than by her current class position, with wives drawing more on their husbands' current jobs; (5) the dynamic model of class provides a better fit than the structural model; and (6) "individuals in families" are the most appropriate unit of class analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-448
Number of pages23
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

class position
husband
politics
wife
gender
class identification
structural model
spouse

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

@article{beb8a3bbc22a4408ad72a029d0bb1877,
title = "Class, gender, and the family unit: A dynamic model of stratification and class politics",
abstract = "One of the most controversial issues in the literature on class and gender has been how to understand the class positions of dual earner couples. However, a central issue in this debate is, in fact, not testable using typical sample surveys: there is no way to assess if spouses who have different objective class positions also have different subjective class affinities. We use a large sample of British dual earner couples to address this for the first time. Based on our analysis, we have six conclusions: (1) Most couples agree on their class identification and on class politics; (2) this family class effect is not due to common consumption patterns; (3) cross-class couples disagree no more often than same-class couples, undermining the individualistic perspective; (4) husbands are more influenced by their wives' class of origin than by her current class position, with wives drawing more on their husbands' current jobs; (5) the dynamic model of class provides a better fit than the structural model; and (6) {"}individuals in families{"} are the most appropriate unit of class analysis.",
author = "Eric Plutzer and Zipp, {John F.}",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1006/ssre.2001.0705",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "426--448",
journal = "Social Science Research",
issn = "0049-089X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Class, gender, and the family unit : A dynamic model of stratification and class politics. / Plutzer, Eric; Zipp, John F.

In: Social Science Research, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 426-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Class, gender, and the family unit

T2 - A dynamic model of stratification and class politics

AU - Plutzer, Eric

AU - Zipp, John F.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - One of the most controversial issues in the literature on class and gender has been how to understand the class positions of dual earner couples. However, a central issue in this debate is, in fact, not testable using typical sample surveys: there is no way to assess if spouses who have different objective class positions also have different subjective class affinities. We use a large sample of British dual earner couples to address this for the first time. Based on our analysis, we have six conclusions: (1) Most couples agree on their class identification and on class politics; (2) this family class effect is not due to common consumption patterns; (3) cross-class couples disagree no more often than same-class couples, undermining the individualistic perspective; (4) husbands are more influenced by their wives' class of origin than by her current class position, with wives drawing more on their husbands' current jobs; (5) the dynamic model of class provides a better fit than the structural model; and (6) "individuals in families" are the most appropriate unit of class analysis.

AB - One of the most controversial issues in the literature on class and gender has been how to understand the class positions of dual earner couples. However, a central issue in this debate is, in fact, not testable using typical sample surveys: there is no way to assess if spouses who have different objective class positions also have different subjective class affinities. We use a large sample of British dual earner couples to address this for the first time. Based on our analysis, we have six conclusions: (1) Most couples agree on their class identification and on class politics; (2) this family class effect is not due to common consumption patterns; (3) cross-class couples disagree no more often than same-class couples, undermining the individualistic perspective; (4) husbands are more influenced by their wives' class of origin than by her current class position, with wives drawing more on their husbands' current jobs; (5) the dynamic model of class provides a better fit than the structural model; and (6) "individuals in families" are the most appropriate unit of class analysis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035180871&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035180871&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/ssre.2001.0705

DO - 10.1006/ssre.2001.0705

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 426

EP - 448

JO - Social Science Research

JF - Social Science Research

SN - 0049-089X

IS - 3

ER -