Class, race, and the face: Social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition

Edwin R. Shriver, Steven G. Young, Kurt Hugenberg, Michael J. Bernstein, Jason R. Lanter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current research investigates the hypothesis that the well-established cross-race effect (CRE; better recognition for same-race than for cross-race faces) is due to social-cognitive mechanisms rather than to differential perceptual expertise with same-race and cross-race faces. Across three experiments, the social context in which faces are presented has a direct influence on the CRE. In the first two experiments, middle-class White perceivers show superior recognition for same-race White faces presented in wealthy but not in impoverished contexts. The second experiment indicates this effect is due to the tendency to categorize White faces in impoverished contexts as outgroup members (e.g., "poor Whites"). In the third experiment, this effect is replicated using different ingroup and outgroup categorizations (university affiliation), with ingroup White faces being recognized better than outgroup White faces. In line with a social-cognitive model of the CRE, context had no influence on recognition for cross-race Black faces across the three experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-274
Number of pages15
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

Fingerprint

Facial Recognition
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Shriver, Edwin R. ; Young, Steven G. ; Hugenberg, Kurt ; Bernstein, Michael J. ; Lanter, Jason R. / Class, race, and the face : Social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition. In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2008 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 260-274.
@article{d07d067e60064c9fa2989edfa68d6fd8,
title = "Class, race, and the face: Social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition",
abstract = "The current research investigates the hypothesis that the well-established cross-race effect (CRE; better recognition for same-race than for cross-race faces) is due to social-cognitive mechanisms rather than to differential perceptual expertise with same-race and cross-race faces. Across three experiments, the social context in which faces are presented has a direct influence on the CRE. In the first two experiments, middle-class White perceivers show superior recognition for same-race White faces presented in wealthy but not in impoverished contexts. The second experiment indicates this effect is due to the tendency to categorize White faces in impoverished contexts as outgroup members (e.g., {"}poor Whites{"}). In the third experiment, this effect is replicated using different ingroup and outgroup categorizations (university affiliation), with ingroup White faces being recognized better than outgroup White faces. In line with a social-cognitive model of the CRE, context had no influence on recognition for cross-race Black faces across the three experiments.",
author = "Shriver, {Edwin R.} and Young, {Steven G.} and Kurt Hugenberg and Bernstein, {Michael J.} and Lanter, {Jason R.}",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0146167207310455",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "260--274",
journal = "Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin",
issn = "0146-1672",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Class, race, and the face : Social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition. / Shriver, Edwin R.; Young, Steven G.; Hugenberg, Kurt; Bernstein, Michael J.; Lanter, Jason R.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.02.2008, p. 260-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Class, race, and the face

T2 - Social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition

AU - Shriver, Edwin R.

AU - Young, Steven G.

AU - Hugenberg, Kurt

AU - Bernstein, Michael J.

AU - Lanter, Jason R.

PY - 2008/2/1

Y1 - 2008/2/1

N2 - The current research investigates the hypothesis that the well-established cross-race effect (CRE; better recognition for same-race than for cross-race faces) is due to social-cognitive mechanisms rather than to differential perceptual expertise with same-race and cross-race faces. Across three experiments, the social context in which faces are presented has a direct influence on the CRE. In the first two experiments, middle-class White perceivers show superior recognition for same-race White faces presented in wealthy but not in impoverished contexts. The second experiment indicates this effect is due to the tendency to categorize White faces in impoverished contexts as outgroup members (e.g., "poor Whites"). In the third experiment, this effect is replicated using different ingroup and outgroup categorizations (university affiliation), with ingroup White faces being recognized better than outgroup White faces. In line with a social-cognitive model of the CRE, context had no influence on recognition for cross-race Black faces across the three experiments.

AB - The current research investigates the hypothesis that the well-established cross-race effect (CRE; better recognition for same-race than for cross-race faces) is due to social-cognitive mechanisms rather than to differential perceptual expertise with same-race and cross-race faces. Across three experiments, the social context in which faces are presented has a direct influence on the CRE. In the first two experiments, middle-class White perceivers show superior recognition for same-race White faces presented in wealthy but not in impoverished contexts. The second experiment indicates this effect is due to the tendency to categorize White faces in impoverished contexts as outgroup members (e.g., "poor Whites"). In the third experiment, this effect is replicated using different ingroup and outgroup categorizations (university affiliation), with ingroup White faces being recognized better than outgroup White faces. In line with a social-cognitive model of the CRE, context had no influence on recognition for cross-race Black faces across the three experiments.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38349081667&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38349081667&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0146167207310455

DO - 10.1177/0146167207310455

M3 - Article

C2 - 18212334

AN - SCOPUS:38349081667

VL - 34

SP - 260

EP - 274

JO - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

JF - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

SN - 0146-1672

IS - 2

ER -