Classification of Protein Function

Arthur Lesk, Helen Parkinson, James C. Whisstock

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Annotation of a genome requires assignment of functions to gene products, in most cases on the basis of amino acid sequence alone. The goal of structural genomics projects is to make three dimensional information available, which is invaluable in assessing inferences from amino acid sequences. Nevertheless, prediction of protein function, even if sequence and structure are known, is in many cases a difficult problem. Comparative genomics and patterns of interaction sometimes provide essential clues. Some methods provide reasonable guesses at function, but none is foolproof. An underlying problem is that function is in many cases an ill defined concept. In this article we review the state of the art in function prediction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDatabase Annotation in Molecular Biology
Subtitle of host publicationPrinciples and Practice
Publisherwiley
Pages167-183
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9780470012420
ISBN (Print)0470856815, 9780470856819
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2005

Fingerprint

Genomics
Amino Acid Sequence
amino acid sequences
taxonomy
genomics
prediction
Proteins
proteins
Genome
Genes
genome
Amino Acids
genes
methodology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Lesk, A., Parkinson, H., & Whisstock, J. C. (2005). Classification of Protein Function. In Database Annotation in Molecular Biology: Principles and Practice (pp. 167-183). wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/0470012420.ch10
Lesk, Arthur ; Parkinson, Helen ; Whisstock, James C. / Classification of Protein Function. Database Annotation in Molecular Biology: Principles and Practice. wiley, 2005. pp. 167-183
@inbook{475752183cb04b409e8734baecf33b74,
title = "Classification of Protein Function",
abstract = "Annotation of a genome requires assignment of functions to gene products, in most cases on the basis of amino acid sequence alone. The goal of structural genomics projects is to make three dimensional information available, which is invaluable in assessing inferences from amino acid sequences. Nevertheless, prediction of protein function, even if sequence and structure are known, is in many cases a difficult problem. Comparative genomics and patterns of interaction sometimes provide essential clues. Some methods provide reasonable guesses at function, but none is foolproof. An underlying problem is that function is in many cases an ill defined concept. In this article we review the state of the art in function prediction.",
author = "Arthur Lesk and Helen Parkinson and Whisstock, {James C.}",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1002/0470012420.ch10",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0470856815",
pages = "167--183",
booktitle = "Database Annotation in Molecular Biology",
publisher = "wiley",

}

Lesk, A, Parkinson, H & Whisstock, JC 2005, Classification of Protein Function. in Database Annotation in Molecular Biology: Principles and Practice. wiley, pp. 167-183. https://doi.org/10.1002/0470012420.ch10

Classification of Protein Function. / Lesk, Arthur; Parkinson, Helen; Whisstock, James C.

Database Annotation in Molecular Biology: Principles and Practice. wiley, 2005. p. 167-183.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Classification of Protein Function

AU - Lesk, Arthur

AU - Parkinson, Helen

AU - Whisstock, James C.

PY - 2005/6/8

Y1 - 2005/6/8

N2 - Annotation of a genome requires assignment of functions to gene products, in most cases on the basis of amino acid sequence alone. The goal of structural genomics projects is to make three dimensional information available, which is invaluable in assessing inferences from amino acid sequences. Nevertheless, prediction of protein function, even if sequence and structure are known, is in many cases a difficult problem. Comparative genomics and patterns of interaction sometimes provide essential clues. Some methods provide reasonable guesses at function, but none is foolproof. An underlying problem is that function is in many cases an ill defined concept. In this article we review the state of the art in function prediction.

AB - Annotation of a genome requires assignment of functions to gene products, in most cases on the basis of amino acid sequence alone. The goal of structural genomics projects is to make three dimensional information available, which is invaluable in assessing inferences from amino acid sequences. Nevertheless, prediction of protein function, even if sequence and structure are known, is in many cases a difficult problem. Comparative genomics and patterns of interaction sometimes provide essential clues. Some methods provide reasonable guesses at function, but none is foolproof. An underlying problem is that function is in many cases an ill defined concept. In this article we review the state of the art in function prediction.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884566343&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884566343&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/0470012420.ch10

DO - 10.1002/0470012420.ch10

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84884566343

SN - 0470856815

SN - 9780470856819

SP - 167

EP - 183

BT - Database Annotation in Molecular Biology

PB - wiley

ER -

Lesk A, Parkinson H, Whisstock JC. Classification of Protein Function. In Database Annotation in Molecular Biology: Principles and Practice. wiley. 2005. p. 167-183 https://doi.org/10.1002/0470012420.ch10