Classroom flip in a senior-level engineering course and comparison to previous version

Jeffrey A. Laman, Mary Lynn Brannon, Irene B. Mena

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As students enter the final year of an engineering curriculum, an increased responsibility for selfdirected learning is highly desirable. Students about to embark on a career must independently be able to meet professional development demands in a rapidly changing engineering environment. Students who arrive in class with assigned reading completed, notes reviewed, and prepared for classroom activities are developing the ability to be self-directed learners. Limited classroom contact time can be much more effectively utilized by focusing on concepts and applications identified by students as needing further review and explanation. This paper describes changes implemented to a Civil Engineering "Structural Design of Foundations" course at a Penn State University's College of Engineering. These included short pre-class assignments and quizzes that were designed to increase students' preparation for the next class meeting, as such flipping class meeting preparation to outside the classroom. A benefit of these changes is that the instructor can significantly reduce the time spent lecturing and focus on application of concepts and understanding of processes. Focusing on in-class student activities fosters student-centered learning with the student having the responsibility to prepare for each class session. This paper describes the current study and shares previous results. Those instructors who are interested in using a classroom flip strategy to prepare students for class may benefit from this paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
PublisherAmerican Society for Engineering Education
ISBN (Print)9780878232413
StatePublished - 2012
Event119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Jun 10 2012Jun 13 2012

Other

Other119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period6/10/126/13/12

Fingerprint

Students
Civil engineering
Structural design
Curricula

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Laman, J. A., Brannon, M. L., & Mena, I. B. (2012). Classroom flip in a senior-level engineering course and comparison to previous version. In 119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition American Society for Engineering Education.
Laman, Jeffrey A. ; Brannon, Mary Lynn ; Mena, Irene B. / Classroom flip in a senior-level engineering course and comparison to previous version. 119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition. American Society for Engineering Education, 2012.
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Laman, JA, Brannon, ML & Mena, IB 2012, Classroom flip in a senior-level engineering course and comparison to previous version. in 119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition. American Society for Engineering Education, 119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, San Antonio, TX, United States, 6/10/12.

Classroom flip in a senior-level engineering course and comparison to previous version. / Laman, Jeffrey A.; Brannon, Mary Lynn; Mena, Irene B.

119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition. American Society for Engineering Education, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Laman JA, Brannon ML, Mena IB. Classroom flip in a senior-level engineering course and comparison to previous version. In 119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition. American Society for Engineering Education. 2012