Claustrophobic tendencies and continuous positive airway pressure therapy non-adherence in adults with obstructive sleep apnea

Janalyn Cantey Edmonds, Hyunju Yang, Tonya S. King, Douglas A. Sawyer, Albert Rizzo, Amy M. Sawyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

(1) Determine claustrophobia frequency in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after first CPAP night; (2) determine if claustrophobia influences CPAP non-adherence. Background: Claustrophobia is common among CPAP-treated OSA adults yet few studies have examined the problem. Methods: Secondary analysis of prospective, longitudinal study of OSA adults (n=97). CPAP-Adapted Fear and Avoidance Scale (CPAP-FAAS) collected immediately after CPAP titration polysomnogram. Primary outcome: objective CPAP use at 1week and 1month. Results: Sixty-three percent had claustrophobic tendencies. Females had higher CPAP-FAAS scores than males. FAAS ≥25, positive score for claustrophobic tendencies, was influential on CPAP non-adherence at 1week (aOR= 5.53, 95% CI 1.04, 29.24, p=0.04) and less CPAP use at 1month (aOR=5.06, 95% CI 1.48, 17.37, p = 0.01) when adjusted for body mass index and CPAP mask style. Conclusion: Claustrophobia is prevalent among CPAP-treated OSA adults and influences short-term and longer-term CPAP non-adherence. Interventions are needed to address this treatment-related barrier.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-106
Number of pages7
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Phobic Disorders
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Fear
Therapeutics
Masks
Longitudinal Studies
Body Mass Index
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Edmonds, Janalyn Cantey ; Yang, Hyunju ; King, Tonya S. ; Sawyer, Douglas A. ; Rizzo, Albert ; Sawyer, Amy M. / Claustrophobic tendencies and continuous positive airway pressure therapy non-adherence in adults with obstructive sleep apnea. In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care. 2015 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 100-106.
@article{1db7c81299944f03a0c1321e01033350,
title = "Claustrophobic tendencies and continuous positive airway pressure therapy non-adherence in adults with obstructive sleep apnea",
abstract = "(1) Determine claustrophobia frequency in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after first CPAP night; (2) determine if claustrophobia influences CPAP non-adherence. Background: Claustrophobia is common among CPAP-treated OSA adults yet few studies have examined the problem. Methods: Secondary analysis of prospective, longitudinal study of OSA adults (n=97). CPAP-Adapted Fear and Avoidance Scale (CPAP-FAAS) collected immediately after CPAP titration polysomnogram. Primary outcome: objective CPAP use at 1week and 1month. Results: Sixty-three percent had claustrophobic tendencies. Females had higher CPAP-FAAS scores than males. FAAS ≥25, positive score for claustrophobic tendencies, was influential on CPAP non-adherence at 1week (aOR= 5.53, 95{\%} CI 1.04, 29.24, p=0.04) and less CPAP use at 1month (aOR=5.06, 95{\%} CI 1.48, 17.37, p = 0.01) when adjusted for body mass index and CPAP mask style. Conclusion: Claustrophobia is prevalent among CPAP-treated OSA adults and influences short-term and longer-term CPAP non-adherence. Interventions are needed to address this treatment-related barrier.",
author = "Edmonds, {Janalyn Cantey} and Hyunju Yang and King, {Tonya S.} and Sawyer, {Douglas A.} and Albert Rizzo and Sawyer, {Amy M.}",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.hrtlng.2015.01.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "100--106",
journal = "Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care",
issn = "0147-9563",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Claustrophobic tendencies and continuous positive airway pressure therapy non-adherence in adults with obstructive sleep apnea. / Edmonds, Janalyn Cantey; Yang, Hyunju; King, Tonya S.; Sawyer, Douglas A.; Rizzo, Albert; Sawyer, Amy M.

In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, Vol. 44, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 100-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Claustrophobic tendencies and continuous positive airway pressure therapy non-adherence in adults with obstructive sleep apnea

AU - Edmonds, Janalyn Cantey

AU - Yang, Hyunju

AU - King, Tonya S.

AU - Sawyer, Douglas A.

AU - Rizzo, Albert

AU - Sawyer, Amy M.

PY - 2015/3/1

Y1 - 2015/3/1

N2 - (1) Determine claustrophobia frequency in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after first CPAP night; (2) determine if claustrophobia influences CPAP non-adherence. Background: Claustrophobia is common among CPAP-treated OSA adults yet few studies have examined the problem. Methods: Secondary analysis of prospective, longitudinal study of OSA adults (n=97). CPAP-Adapted Fear and Avoidance Scale (CPAP-FAAS) collected immediately after CPAP titration polysomnogram. Primary outcome: objective CPAP use at 1week and 1month. Results: Sixty-three percent had claustrophobic tendencies. Females had higher CPAP-FAAS scores than males. FAAS ≥25, positive score for claustrophobic tendencies, was influential on CPAP non-adherence at 1week (aOR= 5.53, 95% CI 1.04, 29.24, p=0.04) and less CPAP use at 1month (aOR=5.06, 95% CI 1.48, 17.37, p = 0.01) when adjusted for body mass index and CPAP mask style. Conclusion: Claustrophobia is prevalent among CPAP-treated OSA adults and influences short-term and longer-term CPAP non-adherence. Interventions are needed to address this treatment-related barrier.

AB - (1) Determine claustrophobia frequency in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after first CPAP night; (2) determine if claustrophobia influences CPAP non-adherence. Background: Claustrophobia is common among CPAP-treated OSA adults yet few studies have examined the problem. Methods: Secondary analysis of prospective, longitudinal study of OSA adults (n=97). CPAP-Adapted Fear and Avoidance Scale (CPAP-FAAS) collected immediately after CPAP titration polysomnogram. Primary outcome: objective CPAP use at 1week and 1month. Results: Sixty-three percent had claustrophobic tendencies. Females had higher CPAP-FAAS scores than males. FAAS ≥25, positive score for claustrophobic tendencies, was influential on CPAP non-adherence at 1week (aOR= 5.53, 95% CI 1.04, 29.24, p=0.04) and less CPAP use at 1month (aOR=5.06, 95% CI 1.48, 17.37, p = 0.01) when adjusted for body mass index and CPAP mask style. Conclusion: Claustrophobia is prevalent among CPAP-treated OSA adults and influences short-term and longer-term CPAP non-adherence. Interventions are needed to address this treatment-related barrier.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924390111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84924390111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2015.01.002

DO - 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2015.01.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 25744632

AN - SCOPUS:84924390111

VL - 44

SP - 100

EP - 106

JO - Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care

JF - Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care

SN - 0147-9563

IS - 2

ER -