Clay minerals

Karl Todd Mueller, Rebecca L. Sanders, Nancy M. Washton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-28
Number of pages16
JournaleMagRes
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Clay minerals
Minerals
Magic angle spinning
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Aluminosilicates
Nutrients
Isotopes
Chemical reactions
Particle Size
Particle size
clay
Soils
Soil
Molecules
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Mueller, K. T., Sanders, R. L., & Washton, N. M. (2014). Clay minerals. eMagRes, 3(1), 13-28. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470034590.emrstm1332
Mueller, Karl Todd ; Sanders, Rebecca L. ; Washton, Nancy M. / Clay minerals. In: eMagRes. 2014 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 13-28.
@article{e5ca83e7716b42b582fb0266177a8077,
title = "Clay minerals",
abstract = "Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.",
author = "Mueller, {Karl Todd} and Sanders, {Rebecca L.} and Washton, {Nancy M.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/9780470034590.emrstm1332",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "13--28",
journal = "eMagRes",
issn = "2055-6101",
publisher = "Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Mueller, KT, Sanders, RL & Washton, NM 2014, 'Clay minerals', eMagRes, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 13-28. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470034590.emrstm1332

Clay minerals. / Mueller, Karl Todd; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

In: eMagRes, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 13-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clay minerals

AU - Mueller, Karl Todd

AU - Sanders, Rebecca L.

AU - Washton, Nancy M.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

AB - Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85021401595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85021401595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/9780470034590.emrstm1332

DO - 10.1002/9780470034590.emrstm1332

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85021401595

VL - 3

SP - 13

EP - 28

JO - eMagRes

JF - eMagRes

SN - 2055-6101

IS - 1

ER -

Mueller KT, Sanders RL, Washton NM. Clay minerals. eMagRes. 2014 Jan 1;3(1):13-28. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470034590.emrstm1332