Climate change and plant biosecurity

Implications for policy

Jo Luck, Ian D. Campbell, Roger Magarey, Scott Alan Isard, Jean Philippe Aurambout, Kyla Finlay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Projected future climates, such as increasing temperature, increasing atmospheric CO2, altered precipitation patterns and increases in the frequency of climatic extremes, are likely to alter the performance and distribution of crops as well as influence the entry, establishment and spread of invasive weeds, pests and pathogens that affect them. Climate change will require a revision of current biosecurity practices, such as preparedness, prevention, containment policies, surveillance response, incursion management and trade and market access issues. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of the climate change events affecting the biology and distribution of species that represent a biosecurity threat to agricultural and forestry production. Using two case studies, the Asiatic Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citriSKuwayama) and Asian Soybean Rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow and P. Sydow), we explore ways that climate change will affect invasive species and how biosecurity agencies can use information to minimise the spread of invasive weeds, pests and pathogens. Armed with knowledge of the likely effects of climate change on the biology of organisms and their geographical distribution, we examine the implications to existing biosecurity policy. We recommend that future research focus on: (1) Improvement to atmospheric transport models of species due to major storm events; (2) Identification and prioritization of new and existing pest threats; (3) Identification and documentation of pest status changes and potential new interactions; (4) Development of guidelines for incorporating climate change into pest risk analysis and other policy guidelines and (5) Incorporation of future climate scenarios into currently deployed operational pest models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Handbook of Plant Biosecurity
Subtitle of host publicationPrinciples and Practices for the Identification, Containment and Control of Organisms that Threaten Agriculture and the Environment Globally
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages655-691
Number of pages37
ISBN (Electronic)9789400773653
ISBN (Print)9789400773646
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Climate Change
biosecurity
climate change
pests
Plant Weeds
Climate
Diaphorina
Guidelines
Introduced Species
Forestry
weeds
Hemiptera
Phakopsora pachyrhizi
Citrus
soybean rust
Policy Making
climate
market access
Biological Sciences
Psyllidae

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Luck, J., Campbell, I. D., Magarey, R., Isard, S. A., Aurambout, J. P., & Finlay, K. (2014). Climate change and plant biosecurity: Implications for policy. In The Handbook of Plant Biosecurity: Principles and Practices for the Identification, Containment and Control of Organisms that Threaten Agriculture and the Environment Globally (pp. 655-691). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7365-3_21
Luck, Jo ; Campbell, Ian D. ; Magarey, Roger ; Isard, Scott Alan ; Aurambout, Jean Philippe ; Finlay, Kyla. / Climate change and plant biosecurity : Implications for policy. The Handbook of Plant Biosecurity: Principles and Practices for the Identification, Containment and Control of Organisms that Threaten Agriculture and the Environment Globally. Springer Netherlands, 2014. pp. 655-691
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Luck, J, Campbell, ID, Magarey, R, Isard, SA, Aurambout, JP & Finlay, K 2014, Climate change and plant biosecurity: Implications for policy. in The Handbook of Plant Biosecurity: Principles and Practices for the Identification, Containment and Control of Organisms that Threaten Agriculture and the Environment Globally. Springer Netherlands, pp. 655-691. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7365-3_21

Climate change and plant biosecurity : Implications for policy. / Luck, Jo; Campbell, Ian D.; Magarey, Roger; Isard, Scott Alan; Aurambout, Jean Philippe; Finlay, Kyla.

The Handbook of Plant Biosecurity: Principles and Practices for the Identification, Containment and Control of Organisms that Threaten Agriculture and the Environment Globally. Springer Netherlands, 2014. p. 655-691.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Luck J, Campbell ID, Magarey R, Isard SA, Aurambout JP, Finlay K. Climate change and plant biosecurity: Implications for policy. In The Handbook of Plant Biosecurity: Principles and Practices for the Identification, Containment and Control of Organisms that Threaten Agriculture and the Environment Globally. Springer Netherlands. 2014. p. 655-691 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7365-3_21