Climate related sea-level variations over the past two millennia

Andrew C. Kemp, Benjamin P. Horton, Jeffrey P. Donnelly, Michael E. Mann, Martin Vermeer, Stefan Rahmstorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

242 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present new sea-level reconstructions for the past 2100 y based on salt-marsh sedimentary sequences from the US Atlantic coast. The data from North Carolina reveal four phases of persistent sea-level change after correction for glacial isostatic adjustment. Sea level was stable from at least BC 100 until AD 950. Sea level then increased for 400 y at a rate of 0.6 mm/y, followed by a further period of stable, or slightly falling, sea level that persisted until the late 19th century. Since then, sea level has risen at an average rate of 2.1 mm/y, representing the steepest century-scale increase of the past two millennia. This rate was initiated between AD 1865 and 1892. Using an extended semiempirical modeling approach, we show that these sea-level changes are consistent with global temperature for at least the past millennium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11017-11022
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume108
Issue number27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 5 2011

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Climate
Oceans and Seas
Wetlands
Salts
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Kemp, Andrew C. ; Horton, Benjamin P. ; Donnelly, Jeffrey P. ; Mann, Michael E. ; Vermeer, Martin ; Rahmstorf, Stefan. / Climate related sea-level variations over the past two millennia. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2011 ; Vol. 108, No. 27. pp. 11017-11022.
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Climate related sea-level variations over the past two millennia. / Kemp, Andrew C.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Mann, Michael E.; Vermeer, Martin; Rahmstorf, Stefan.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 108, No. 27, 05.07.2011, p. 11017-11022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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