Clinical characteristics, EEG findings and implications of status epilepticus in patients with brain metastases

Jonah Fox, Shaun Ajinkya, Adam Greenblatt, Peter Houston, Alain Lekoubou, Scott Lindhorst, David Cachia, Adriana Olar, Ekrem Kutluay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implications of status epilepticus in patients with metastases to the brain as well as associated demographic, clinical, EEG and radiographic features. Methods: Retrospective chart review of 19 patients with metastases to the brain who subsequently developed status epilepticus. Results: Of the patients who developed status epilepticus only 36.8% had a prior history of seizures since diagnosis of brain metastases. Status epilepticus most commonly occurred in the setting of a new structural injury to the brain such as new metastases, increase in size of metastases or hemorrhage. 57.9% of patients had either refractory or super-refractory status epilepticus. Focal non-convulsive status epilepticus was the most common subtype occurring in 42.1% of patients. 31.6% of patients died within 30 days of the onset of status epilepticus. Conclusion: Status epilepticus eventually resolved with treatment in all patients with brain metastases; however, it is associated with poor outcomes as nearly one-third was deceased within 30-days of onset. Nevertheless, no patients died during status epilepticus. Thus, status epilepticus may be indicative of an overall poor clinical status among patients with brain metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116538
JournalJournal of the neurological sciences
Volume407
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2019

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Status Epilepticus
Electroencephalography
Neoplasm Metastasis
Brain
Brain Injuries
Seizures
Demography
Hemorrhage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Fox, Jonah ; Ajinkya, Shaun ; Greenblatt, Adam ; Houston, Peter ; Lekoubou, Alain ; Lindhorst, Scott ; Cachia, David ; Olar, Adriana ; Kutluay, Ekrem. / Clinical characteristics, EEG findings and implications of status epilepticus in patients with brain metastases. In: Journal of the neurological sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 407.
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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implications of status epilepticus in patients with metastases to the brain as well as associated demographic, clinical, EEG and radiographic features. Methods: Retrospective chart review of 19 patients with metastases to the brain who subsequently developed status epilepticus. Results: Of the patients who developed status epilepticus only 36.8{\%} had a prior history of seizures since diagnosis of brain metastases. Status epilepticus most commonly occurred in the setting of a new structural injury to the brain such as new metastases, increase in size of metastases or hemorrhage. 57.9{\%} of patients had either refractory or super-refractory status epilepticus. Focal non-convulsive status epilepticus was the most common subtype occurring in 42.1{\%} of patients. 31.6{\%} of patients died within 30 days of the onset of status epilepticus. Conclusion: Status epilepticus eventually resolved with treatment in all patients with brain metastases; however, it is associated with poor outcomes as nearly one-third was deceased within 30-days of onset. Nevertheless, no patients died during status epilepticus. Thus, status epilepticus may be indicative of an overall poor clinical status among patients with brain metastases.",
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Clinical characteristics, EEG findings and implications of status epilepticus in patients with brain metastases. / Fox, Jonah; Ajinkya, Shaun; Greenblatt, Adam; Houston, Peter; Lekoubou, Alain; Lindhorst, Scott; Cachia, David; Olar, Adriana; Kutluay, Ekrem.

In: Journal of the neurological sciences, Vol. 407, 116538, 15.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Ajinkya, Shaun

AU - Greenblatt, Adam

AU - Houston, Peter

AU - Lekoubou, Alain

AU - Lindhorst, Scott

AU - Cachia, David

AU - Olar, Adriana

AU - Kutluay, Ekrem

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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implications of status epilepticus in patients with metastases to the brain as well as associated demographic, clinical, EEG and radiographic features. Methods: Retrospective chart review of 19 patients with metastases to the brain who subsequently developed status epilepticus. Results: Of the patients who developed status epilepticus only 36.8% had a prior history of seizures since diagnosis of brain metastases. Status epilepticus most commonly occurred in the setting of a new structural injury to the brain such as new metastases, increase in size of metastases or hemorrhage. 57.9% of patients had either refractory or super-refractory status epilepticus. Focal non-convulsive status epilepticus was the most common subtype occurring in 42.1% of patients. 31.6% of patients died within 30 days of the onset of status epilepticus. Conclusion: Status epilepticus eventually resolved with treatment in all patients with brain metastases; however, it is associated with poor outcomes as nearly one-third was deceased within 30-days of onset. Nevertheless, no patients died during status epilepticus. Thus, status epilepticus may be indicative of an overall poor clinical status among patients with brain metastases.

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