Clinical correlates of generalized worry in multiple sclerosis

Jared M. Bruce, Peter Arnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anxiety disorders are common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Chronic worry is the defining feature of generalized anxiety. Despite this, only one study has examined the impact of chronic worry in MS. The present investigation explored the relationship between excessive worry and common physical, emotional, and neuropsychological symptoms in a community-based sample of 50 patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive MS. As expected, MS patients reported significantly more worry than a group of 45 healthy controls. Correlational analyses revealed that MS patients' elevated worry was associated with fatigue, sleep disturbance, problem-solving deficits, pain, and disability status. Follow-up analyses indicated that worry and anxiety may represent related but distinct constructs. Clinicians are urged to regularly monitor and treat pathological worry in MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-705
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Multiple Sclerosis
Anxiety
Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
Anxiety Disorders
Fatigue
Sleep
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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Clinical correlates of generalized worry in multiple sclerosis. / Bruce, Jared M.; Arnett, Peter.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.08.2009, p. 698-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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