Clinical features, management strategies, and visual acuity outcomes of Candida endophthalmitis following cataract surgery

Ninel Z. Gregori, Harry W. Flynn, Darlene Miller, Ingrid Scott, Janet L. Davis, Timothy G. Murray, Basil Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

■ BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To report the clinical features, management, and visual outcome in patients with Candida endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. ■ PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Bascom Palmer Eye Institute Microbiology Laboratory database and corresponding medical records were reviewed from 1980 to 2006. ■ RESULTS: Five patients were identified. Endophthalmitis developed 7 to 60 days postoperatively (median, 14 days). Presenting visual acuity was 20/200 to counting fingers and final visual acuity was 20/25 to light perception. Whitish material was noted on the intraocular lens or lens capsule (4 of 5) or within the cataract wound (1 of 5). All patients received intravitreal amphotericin B and more than one pars plana vitrectomy procedure; four received systemic antifungal agents and four underwent intraocular lens removal. ■ CONCLUSIONS: Given whitish material on the intraocular lens, lens capsule, or cataract wound, Candida should be included in the differential diagnosis of early- or delayed-onset endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Initial pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal and oral antifungal medications may not achieve infection resolution. Intraocular lens explantation may assist in organism eradication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-385
Number of pages8
JournalOphthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging
Volume38
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Endophthalmitis
Intraocular Lenses
Candida
Cataract
Visual Acuity
Temazepam
Vitrectomy
Lenses
Capsules
Antifungal Agents
Wounds and Injuries
Amphotericin B
Microbiology
Fingers
Medical Records
Differential Diagnosis
Databases
Light
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Gregori, N. Z., Flynn, H. W., Miller, D., Scott, I., Davis, J. L., Murray, T. G., & Williams, B. (2007). Clinical features, management strategies, and visual acuity outcomes of Candida endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Ophthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging, 38(5), 378-385.
Gregori, Ninel Z. ; Flynn, Harry W. ; Miller, Darlene ; Scott, Ingrid ; Davis, Janet L. ; Murray, Timothy G. ; Williams, Basil. / Clinical features, management strategies, and visual acuity outcomes of Candida endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. In: Ophthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging. 2007 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 378-385.
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Clinical features, management strategies, and visual acuity outcomes of Candida endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. / Gregori, Ninel Z.; Flynn, Harry W.; Miller, Darlene; Scott, Ingrid; Davis, Janet L.; Murray, Timothy G.; Williams, Basil.

In: Ophthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.09.2007, p. 378-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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