Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women

Erika F.H. Saunders, Kate D. Fitzgerald, Peng Zhang, Melvin G. McInnis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Anxiety disorders are commonly comorbid with bipolar disorder (BP) and may worsen course of illness, but differential impact of specific anxiety disorders in men and women remains unknown. Methods We measured the impact of comorbid panic disorder (PD), social phobia, specific phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in 460 women and 276 men with Bipolar I Disorder (BPI) or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type from the National Institute of Mental Health Bipolar Genetics Initiative. We compared clinical characteristics in BPwith and without each anxiety disorder in men and women separately correcting for family relatedness. Results Comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia were more common in women with BPthan men. Comorbid social phobia correlated with increased risk of alcohol abuse in BPwomen, but not men. Women with comorbid PDattended fewer years of school. Comorbidity with OCDwas associated with earlier age at the onset of BPfor both genders. Comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia were associated with more antidepressant trials in BP, across both genders, compared to BPpatients without these anxiety disorders. Conclusion In BP, comorbid anxiety disorders are associated with increased risk for functional impairment, and women had differently associated risks than men. Clinicians should be aware of an increased risk for comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia in women with BP, and an increased risk of alcohol abuse in women with BDand comorbid social phobia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)739-746
Number of pages8
JournalDepression and anxiety
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

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Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Panic Disorder
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Alcoholism
National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.)
Age of Onset
Psychotic Disorders
Antidepressive Agents
Comorbidity
Specific Phobia
Social Phobia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Saunders, Erika F.H. ; Fitzgerald, Kate D. ; Zhang, Peng ; McInnis, Melvin G. / Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women. In: Depression and anxiety. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 8. pp. 739-746.
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Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women. / Saunders, Erika F.H.; Fitzgerald, Kate D.; Zhang, Peng; McInnis, Melvin G.

In: Depression and anxiety, Vol. 29, No. 8, 01.08.2012, p. 739-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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