Clinical report - Fever and antipyretic use in children

Janice E. Sullivan, Henry C. Farrar, Daniel A.C. Frattarelli, Jeffrey L. Galinkin, Thomas P. Green, Mary A. Hegenbarth, Mark L. Hudak, Matthew E. Knight, Robert E. Shaddy, Glen S. Frick, Lynne G. Maxwell, Ian Paul, John F. Pope, Thomas G. Wells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fever in a child is one of the most common clinical symptoms managed by pediatricians and other health care providers and a frequent cause of parental concern. Many parents administer antipyretics even when there is minimal or no fever, because they are concerned that the child must maintain a "normal" temperature. Fever, however, is not the primary illness but is a physiologic mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection. There is no evidence that fever itself worsens the course of an illness or that it causes long-term neurologic complications. Thus, the primary goal of treating the febrile child should be to improve the child's overall comfort rather than focus on the normalization of body temperature. When counseling the parents or caregivers of a febrile child, the general well-being of the child, the importance of monitoring activity, observing for signs of serious illness, encouraging appropriate fluid intake, and the safe storage of antipyretics should be emphasized. Current evidence suggests that there is no substantial difference in the safety and effectiveness of acetaminophen and ibuprofen in the care of a generally healthy child with fever. There is evidence that combining these 2 products is more effective than the use of a single agent alone; however, there are concerns that combined treatment may be more complicated and contribute to the unsafe use of these drugs. Pediatricians should also promote patient safety by advocating for simplified formulations, dosing instructions, and dosing devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-587
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume127
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Fingerprint

Antipyretics
Fever
Parents
Ibuprofen
Patient Safety
Acetaminophen
Body Temperature
Child Welfare
Health Personnel
Nervous System
Caregivers
Counseling
Safety
Equipment and Supplies
Temperature
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Sullivan, J. E., Farrar, H. C., Frattarelli, D. A. C., Galinkin, J. L., Green, T. P., Hegenbarth, M. A., ... Wells, T. G. (2011). Clinical report - Fever and antipyretic use in children. Pediatrics, 127(3), 580-587. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-3852
Sullivan, Janice E. ; Farrar, Henry C. ; Frattarelli, Daniel A.C. ; Galinkin, Jeffrey L. ; Green, Thomas P. ; Hegenbarth, Mary A. ; Hudak, Mark L. ; Knight, Matthew E. ; Shaddy, Robert E. ; Frick, Glen S. ; Maxwell, Lynne G. ; Paul, Ian ; Pope, John F. ; Wells, Thomas G. / Clinical report - Fever and antipyretic use in children. In: Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 127, No. 3. pp. 580-587.
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Sullivan, JE, Farrar, HC, Frattarelli, DAC, Galinkin, JL, Green, TP, Hegenbarth, MA, Hudak, ML, Knight, ME, Shaddy, RE, Frick, GS, Maxwell, LG, Paul, I, Pope, JF & Wells, TG 2011, 'Clinical report - Fever and antipyretic use in children', Pediatrics, vol. 127, no. 3, pp. 580-587. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-3852

Clinical report - Fever and antipyretic use in children. / Sullivan, Janice E.; Farrar, Henry C.; Frattarelli, Daniel A.C.; Galinkin, Jeffrey L.; Green, Thomas P.; Hegenbarth, Mary A.; Hudak, Mark L.; Knight, Matthew E.; Shaddy, Robert E.; Frick, Glen S.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Paul, Ian; Pope, John F.; Wells, Thomas G.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 127, No. 3, 01.03.2011, p. 580-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hudak, Mark L.

AU - Knight, Matthew E.

AU - Shaddy, Robert E.

AU - Frick, Glen S.

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AU - Wells, Thomas G.

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Sullivan JE, Farrar HC, Frattarelli DAC, Galinkin JL, Green TP, Hegenbarth MA et al. Clinical report - Fever and antipyretic use in children. Pediatrics. 2011 Mar 1;127(3):580-587. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-3852