Close relationships in task environments: Perceptions of Relational Types, Illicitness, and Power

James Price Dillard, Jerold L. Hale, Chris Segrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports on the impact of the perceived motivations of participants of organizational romances, the illicitness of the relationship, and the power of the relational participants upon individual and group performance. Interviews conducted with 128 observers indicated that (a) only certain types of relationships showed associations with either category of organizational effectiveness indexes, (b) illicitness was generally associated with negative outcomes in the work group, but not in the involved individuals, and (c) neither the power of the participants nor the differences in power between them was reliably associated with declines in either individual performance or work group functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-255
Number of pages29
JournalManagement Communication Quarterly
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1994

Fingerprint

group work
performance
interview
Task environment
Group
Work groups
Individual performance
Observer
Functioning
Group performance
Organizational effectiveness

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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Close relationships in task environments : Perceptions of Relational Types, Illicitness, and Power. / Dillard, James Price; Hale, Jerold L.; Segrin, Chris.

In: Management Communication Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 3, 02.1994, p. 227-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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