Coaching behaviors associated with changes in fear of failure: Changes in self-talk and need satisfaction as potential mechanisms

David E. Conroy, J. Douglas Coatsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive-interpersonal and motivational mechanisms may regulate relations between youth perceptions of interpersonal aspects of the social ecology and their fear-of-failure (FF) levels. Youth (N=165) registered for a summer swim league rated their fear of failure at the beginning, middle, and end of the season. Extensive model comparisons indicated that youths' end-of-season ratings of coach behaviors could be reduced to three factors (affiliation, control, blame). Perceived control and blame from coaches predicted residualized change in corresponding aspects of youths' self-talk, but only changes in self-blame positively predicted changes in FF levels during the season. Perceived affiliation from coaches predicted autonomy need satisfaction which, in turn, negatively predicted the rate of change in FF levels during the season. These findings indicate that (a) youth perceptions of coaches were directly and indirectly related to acute socialization of FF and (b) both cognitive-interpersonal and motivational mechanisms contributed to this socialization process. Further research is needed to test for developmental differences in these mechanisms to determine whether findings generalize to more heterogeneous and at-risk populations and to investigate other potential social-ecological influences on socialization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-419
Number of pages37
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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Coaching behaviors associated with changes in fear of failure : Changes in self-talk and need satisfaction as potential mechanisms. / Conroy, David E.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas.

In: Journal of Personality, Vol. 75, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 383-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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