Coal contributions to the overhead liquids obtained from co-coking in a laboratory scale delayed coker

Omer Gul, Caroline E. Burgess Clifford, Leslie R. Rudnick, Harold Schobert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Coking and co-coking of decant oil and decant oil/coal blends were studied using a large laboratory-scale delayed coker. Four different coals were used in this study: Powelton/Eagle, Canterberry, Pittsburgh, and Marfork. Two petroleum-based decant oils were used for delayed coking and co-coking purposes. In the co-coking experiments, the coal was reacted at 20 and 30% by weight in the blend. Coker pressure was adjusted to two different values for evaluation. Co-coking of decant oil/coal blends produced higher amounts of coke than coking of decant oil alone. Product distribution ranges for co-coking were found to be 22-39% coke, 50-71% liquid, and 1-16% gas. Increasing the amount of coal in the blend and coker back-pressure resulted in a higher percentage of coke formation (which resulted in coke of lower quality), while the total liquid product yield decreased. The objective of this study was to determine molecular contributions from coal to the overhead liquid. The isolated overhead liquid products were subsequently vacuum-distilled into typical refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel and fuel oil). Vacuum distillates were further characterized using GC/MS to investigate the effect of particular coals on the liquid produced from co-coking. GC/MS analyses demonstrated that vacuum fractions of co-coking overhead liquid had higher quantity aromatic components than those of coking. On the other hand, vacuum distillation results showed that co-coking of coal with a decant oil at a higher coal percentage (30 wt% versus 20 wt%) in the blend increased the lighter boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel) in the overhead liquid. In addition, it was found that higher coker back-pressure (50 psig versus 25 psig) also increased the lighter boiling range materials in the overhead liquid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Chemical Society - 237th National Meeting and Exposition, ACS 2009, Abstracts of Scientific Papers
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event237th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009 - Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Duration: Mar 22 2009Mar 26 2009

Publication series

NameACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
ISSN (Print)0065-7727

Other

Other237th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySalt Lake City, UT
Period3/22/093/26/09

Fingerprint

Coal
Coking
Liquids
Oils
Coke
Vacuum
Boiling liquids
Jet fuel
Gasoline
Fuel Oils
Petroleum
Fuel oils
Distillation
Crude oil
Gases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Gul, O., Burgess Clifford, C. E., Rudnick, L. R., & Schobert, H. (2009). Coal contributions to the overhead liquids obtained from co-coking in a laboratory scale delayed coker. In American Chemical Society - 237th National Meeting and Exposition, ACS 2009, Abstracts of Scientific Papers (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).
Gul, Omer ; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E. ; Rudnick, Leslie R. ; Schobert, Harold. / Coal contributions to the overhead liquids obtained from co-coking in a laboratory scale delayed coker. American Chemical Society - 237th National Meeting and Exposition, ACS 2009, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. 2009. (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).
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abstract = "Coking and co-coking of decant oil and decant oil/coal blends were studied using a large laboratory-scale delayed coker. Four different coals were used in this study: Powelton/Eagle, Canterberry, Pittsburgh, and Marfork. Two petroleum-based decant oils were used for delayed coking and co-coking purposes. In the co-coking experiments, the coal was reacted at 20 and 30{\%} by weight in the blend. Coker pressure was adjusted to two different values for evaluation. Co-coking of decant oil/coal blends produced higher amounts of coke than coking of decant oil alone. Product distribution ranges for co-coking were found to be 22-39{\%} coke, 50-71{\%} liquid, and 1-16{\%} gas. Increasing the amount of coal in the blend and coker back-pressure resulted in a higher percentage of coke formation (which resulted in coke of lower quality), while the total liquid product yield decreased. The objective of this study was to determine molecular contributions from coal to the overhead liquid. The isolated overhead liquid products were subsequently vacuum-distilled into typical refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel and fuel oil). Vacuum distillates were further characterized using GC/MS to investigate the effect of particular coals on the liquid produced from co-coking. GC/MS analyses demonstrated that vacuum fractions of co-coking overhead liquid had higher quantity aromatic components than those of coking. On the other hand, vacuum distillation results showed that co-coking of coal with a decant oil at a higher coal percentage (30 wt{\%} versus 20 wt{\%}) in the blend increased the lighter boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel) in the overhead liquid. In addition, it was found that higher coker back-pressure (50 psig versus 25 psig) also increased the lighter boiling range materials in the overhead liquid.",
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Gul, O, Burgess Clifford, CE, Rudnick, LR & Schobert, H 2009, Coal contributions to the overhead liquids obtained from co-coking in a laboratory scale delayed coker. in American Chemical Society - 237th National Meeting and Exposition, ACS 2009, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts, 237th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 3/22/09.

Coal contributions to the overhead liquids obtained from co-coking in a laboratory scale delayed coker. / Gul, Omer; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Rudnick, Leslie R.; Schobert, Harold.

American Chemical Society - 237th National Meeting and Exposition, ACS 2009, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. 2009. (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - Coking and co-coking of decant oil and decant oil/coal blends were studied using a large laboratory-scale delayed coker. Four different coals were used in this study: Powelton/Eagle, Canterberry, Pittsburgh, and Marfork. Two petroleum-based decant oils were used for delayed coking and co-coking purposes. In the co-coking experiments, the coal was reacted at 20 and 30% by weight in the blend. Coker pressure was adjusted to two different values for evaluation. Co-coking of decant oil/coal blends produced higher amounts of coke than coking of decant oil alone. Product distribution ranges for co-coking were found to be 22-39% coke, 50-71% liquid, and 1-16% gas. Increasing the amount of coal in the blend and coker back-pressure resulted in a higher percentage of coke formation (which resulted in coke of lower quality), while the total liquid product yield decreased. The objective of this study was to determine molecular contributions from coal to the overhead liquid. The isolated overhead liquid products were subsequently vacuum-distilled into typical refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel and fuel oil). Vacuum distillates were further characterized using GC/MS to investigate the effect of particular coals on the liquid produced from co-coking. GC/MS analyses demonstrated that vacuum fractions of co-coking overhead liquid had higher quantity aromatic components than those of coking. On the other hand, vacuum distillation results showed that co-coking of coal with a decant oil at a higher coal percentage (30 wt% versus 20 wt%) in the blend increased the lighter boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel) in the overhead liquid. In addition, it was found that higher coker back-pressure (50 psig versus 25 psig) also increased the lighter boiling range materials in the overhead liquid.

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Gul O, Burgess Clifford CE, Rudnick LR, Schobert H. Coal contributions to the overhead liquids obtained from co-coking in a laboratory scale delayed coker. In American Chemical Society - 237th National Meeting and Exposition, ACS 2009, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. 2009. (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).