Coantagonism of glutamate receptors and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors disrupts fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning

Thomas J. Gould, Michael C. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine administered alone, the AMPAR antagonist NBQX administered alone, and the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 administered alone on cued fear conditioning, contextual fear conditioning, and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning were examined. In addition, the effects of coadministration of either mecamylamine and NBQX or mecamylamine and MK-801 on these behaviors were examined. Consistent with previous studies, neither mecamylamine nor NBQX administered alone disrupted any of the tasks. However, coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In addition, coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting either task disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX, and coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting fear conditioning had little effect on cued fear conditioning. These results suggest that nAChRs and glutamate receptors may support similar processes mediating acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-398
Number of pages10
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

Fingerprint

Glutamate Receptors
Nicotinic Receptors
Fear
Mecamylamine
Dizocilpine Maleate
Isoxazoles
Propionates
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Conditioning (Psychology)
Inhibition (Psychology)
Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists
2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)quinoxaline

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{4a6d230f93a747679691d7576323e214,
title = "Coantagonism of glutamate receptors and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors disrupts fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning",
abstract = "The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine administered alone, the AMPAR antagonist NBQX administered alone, and the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 administered alone on cued fear conditioning, contextual fear conditioning, and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning were examined. In addition, the effects of coadministration of either mecamylamine and NBQX or mecamylamine and MK-801 on these behaviors were examined. Consistent with previous studies, neither mecamylamine nor NBQX administered alone disrupted any of the tasks. However, coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In addition, coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting either task disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX, and coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting fear conditioning had little effect on cued fear conditioning. These results suggest that nAChRs and glutamate receptors may support similar processes mediating acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning.",
author = "Gould, {Thomas J.} and Lewis, {Michael C.}",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1101/lm.89105",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "389--398",
journal = "Learning and Memory",
issn = "1072-0502",
publisher = "Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coantagonism of glutamate receptors and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors disrupts fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning

AU - Gould, Thomas J.

AU - Lewis, Michael C.

PY - 2005/7/1

Y1 - 2005/7/1

N2 - The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine administered alone, the AMPAR antagonist NBQX administered alone, and the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 administered alone on cued fear conditioning, contextual fear conditioning, and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning were examined. In addition, the effects of coadministration of either mecamylamine and NBQX or mecamylamine and MK-801 on these behaviors were examined. Consistent with previous studies, neither mecamylamine nor NBQX administered alone disrupted any of the tasks. However, coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In addition, coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting either task disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX, and coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting fear conditioning had little effect on cued fear conditioning. These results suggest that nAChRs and glutamate receptors may support similar processes mediating acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning.

AB - The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine administered alone, the AMPAR antagonist NBQX administered alone, and the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 administered alone on cued fear conditioning, contextual fear conditioning, and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning were examined. In addition, the effects of coadministration of either mecamylamine and NBQX or mecamylamine and MK-801 on these behaviors were examined. Consistent with previous studies, neither mecamylamine nor NBQX administered alone disrupted any of the tasks. However, coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In addition, coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting either task disrupted both contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Coadministration of mecamylamine and NBQX, and coadministration of mecamylamine with a dose of MK-801 subthreshold for disrupting fear conditioning had little effect on cued fear conditioning. These results suggest that nAChRs and glutamate receptors may support similar processes mediating acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and latent inhibition of fear conditioning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23744514938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23744514938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1101/lm.89105

DO - 10.1101/lm.89105

M3 - Article

C2 - 16077017

AN - SCOPUS:23744514938

VL - 12

SP - 389

EP - 398

JO - Learning and Memory

JF - Learning and Memory

SN - 1072-0502

IS - 4

ER -