Coexistent Lyme disease and Parvovirus infection in a child

Justin R. Fisher, Barbara E. Ostrov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infectious diseases commonly cause illnesses that mimic rheumatic diseases. Both Lyme disease and Parvovirus B19 infections produce arthritis, rashes, and a systemic illness that may be thought to represent a chronic rheumatic disease. In the case presented, a child with both infections simultaneously exhibited arthralgias, aseptic meningitis, and a facial rash. The features of Lyme disease and Parvovirus B19 infection that may mimic systemic lupus erythematosus include a facial rash, often in a malar distribution, hematologic abnormalities, arthritis, neurologic disorders, and autoantibody positivity. Given the proper season and geographical location, one must consider the possibility of co-infection with these two organisms, especially in those with atypical rheumatic complaints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-353
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Rheumatology
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Parvoviridae Infections
Lyme Disease
Exanthema
Rheumatic Diseases
Arthritis
Aseptic Meningitis
Arthralgia
Nervous System Diseases
Coinfection
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Autoantibodies
Communicable Diseases
Chronic Disease
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Fisher, Justin R. ; Ostrov, Barbara E. / Coexistent Lyme disease and Parvovirus infection in a child. In: Journal of Clinical Rheumatology. 2001 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 350-353.
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Coexistent Lyme disease and Parvovirus infection in a child. / Fisher, Justin R.; Ostrov, Barbara E.

In: Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, Vol. 7, No. 5, 01.01.2001, p. 350-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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