Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD improves various ptsd symptoms and trauma-related cognitions: Results from a randomized controlled trial

Alexandra Macdonald, Nicole D. Pukay-Martin, Anne C. Wagner, Steffany J. Fredman, Candice M. Monson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous studies document an association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impairments in intimate relationship functioning, and there is evidence that PTSD symptoms and associated impairments are improved by cognitive- behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD (CBCT for PTSD; Monson & Fredman, 2012). The present study investigated changes across treatment in clinician-rated PTSD symptom clusters and patient-rated trauma-related cognitions in a randomized controlled trial comparing CBCT for PTSD with waitlist in a sample of 40 individuals with PTSD and their partners (N = 40; Monson et al., 2012). Compared with waitlist, patients who received CBCT for PTSD immediately demonstrated greater improvements in all PTSD symptom clusters, trauma-related beliefs, and guilt cognitions (Hedge's gs -.33 to -1.51). Results suggest that CBCT for PTSD improves all PTSD symptom clusters and trauma-related cognitions among individuals with PTSD and further supports the value of utilizing a couple-based approach to the treatment of PTSD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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