Cognitive control moderates parenting stress effects on children’s diurnal cortisol

Laurel Raffington, Florian Schmiedek, Christine Marcelle Heim, Yee Lee Shing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated associations between parenting stress in parents and self-reported stress in children with children’s diurnal cortisol secretion and whether these associations are moderated by known stress-regulating capacities, namely child cognitive control. Salivary cortisol concentrations were assessed from awakening to evening on two weekend days from 53 6-to-7-year-old children. Children completed a cognitive control task and a self-report stress questionnaire with an experimenter, while parents completed a parenting stress inventory. Hierarchical, linear mixed effects models revealed that higher parenting stress was associated with overall reduced cortisol secretion in children, and this effect was moderated by cognitive control. Specifically, parenting stress was associated with reduced diurnal cortisol levels in children with lower cognitive control ability and not in children with higher cognitive control ability. There were no effects of self-reported stress in children on their cortisol secretion, presumably because 6-to-7-year-old children cannot yet self-report on stress experiences. Our results suggest that higher cognitive control skills may buffer the effects of parenting stress in parents on their children’s stress regulation in middle childhood. This could indicate that training cognitive control skills in early life could be a target to prevent stress-related disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0191215
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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parenting
Parenting
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
Aptitude
Parents
secretion
Self Report
childhood
Buffers
questionnaires
buffers
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Raffington, Laurel ; Schmiedek, Florian ; Heim, Christine Marcelle ; Shing, Yee Lee. / Cognitive control moderates parenting stress effects on children’s diurnal cortisol. In: PloS one. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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Cognitive control moderates parenting stress effects on children’s diurnal cortisol. / Raffington, Laurel; Schmiedek, Florian; Heim, Christine Marcelle; Shing, Yee Lee.

In: PloS one, Vol. 13, No. 1, e0191215, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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