Cognitive field work in emergency crisis management: Developing the I-T-P abstraction hierarchy

Arthur C. Jones, Michael D. McNeese

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Through a work domain analysis, utilizing a mixed-methods approach, an understanding of the motivations and constraints of the emergency services domain was gathered. The domain analysis revealed a significant shortcoming of the currently-implemented systems when they are tasked to respond to atypical situations, such as mass-casualty incidents. The collected qualitative data was encoded into an abstraction hierarchy model which has been modified to represent the elemental components of an information system: information, technology, and people. The resulting I-T-P Abstraction Hierarchy model can be used to guide the design of information systems which have the capacity to scale between normal day-to-day operations, up to significantly more complex situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006
Pages501-505
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2006Oct 20 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period10/16/0610/20/06

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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