College inflammatory bowel disease (C-IBD) day: a targeted approach to shared decision-making in college age students with IBD—a 2-year pilot project

Kofi Clarke, Mohammad Bilal, Heitham Abdul-Baki, Paul Lebovitz, Sandra El-Hachem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Adherence to treatment is a key therapeutic goal in chronic disorders including diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and hypertension. Non-adherence has been associated with increased health care costs. Previous studies have evaluated adherence to treatment in inflammatory bowel disease, as well as predictors of non-adherence. Higher belief of necessity for medications and membership of IBD patient organizations have been associated with higher medication adherence. Aim: This study aimed to identify patient reported factors that influence understanding of IBD in college age patients with IBD. Methods: We conducted questionnaire based survey among a group of college age patients with IBD who attended a structured program. The program consisted of a clinical appointment with an IBD physician, lecture by an IBD physician, followed by interactive segment between patients. Educational material was available for patients to review. In addition, opportunity was given to patients to share their story and ask questions in a safe environment. Results: A total of 26 patients participated in the two C-IBD sessions over a 2-year period. Twenty-three were enrolled in college, 1 was a recent graduate, and 2 were of college age but not enrolled. All patients thought the program was beneficial, 96% rated the overall experience as “awesome” or “very good.” Seventy-six percent of patients reported sharing their story as the most beneficial. Only 19% found the physician lecture beneficial. Conclusion: A targeted approach to a vulnerable population with IBD is an additional useful tool in improving understanding of IBD. This may lead to improved compliance with management plans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1019-1023
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Decision Making
Students
Physicians
Medication Adherence
Vulnerable Populations
Health Care Costs
Appointments and Schedules
Therapeutics
Age Groups
Organizations
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "College inflammatory bowel disease (C-IBD) day: a targeted approach to shared decision-making in college age students with IBD—a 2-year pilot project",
abstract = "Background: Adherence to treatment is a key therapeutic goal in chronic disorders including diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and hypertension. Non-adherence has been associated with increased health care costs. Previous studies have evaluated adherence to treatment in inflammatory bowel disease, as well as predictors of non-adherence. Higher belief of necessity for medications and membership of IBD patient organizations have been associated with higher medication adherence. Aim: This study aimed to identify patient reported factors that influence understanding of IBD in college age patients with IBD. Methods: We conducted questionnaire based survey among a group of college age patients with IBD who attended a structured program. The program consisted of a clinical appointment with an IBD physician, lecture by an IBD physician, followed by interactive segment between patients. Educational material was available for patients to review. In addition, opportunity was given to patients to share their story and ask questions in a safe environment. Results: A total of 26 patients participated in the two C-IBD sessions over a 2-year period. Twenty-three were enrolled in college, 1 was a recent graduate, and 2 were of college age but not enrolled. All patients thought the program was beneficial, 96{\%} rated the overall experience as “awesome” or “very good.” Seventy-six percent of patients reported sharing their story as the most beneficial. Only 19{\%} found the physician lecture beneficial. Conclusion: A targeted approach to a vulnerable population with IBD is an additional useful tool in improving understanding of IBD. This may lead to improved compliance with management plans.",
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College inflammatory bowel disease (C-IBD) day : a targeted approach to shared decision-making in college age students with IBD—a 2-year pilot project. / Clarke, Kofi; Bilal, Mohammad; Abdul-Baki, Heitham; Lebovitz, Paul; El-Hachem, Sandra.

In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, Vol. 32, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1019-1023.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - a targeted approach to shared decision-making in college age students with IBD—a 2-year pilot project

AU - Clarke, Kofi

AU - Bilal, Mohammad

AU - Abdul-Baki, Heitham

AU - Lebovitz, Paul

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