Combined Influences of Genes, Prenatal Environment, Cortisol, and Parenting on the Development of Children’s Internalizing Versus Externalizing Problems

Kristine Marceau, Heidemarie K. Laurent, Jenae M. Neiderhiser, David Reiss, Daniel S. Shaw, Misaki N. Natsuaki, Philip A. Fisher, Leslie D. Leve

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research suggests that genetic, prenatal, endocrine, and parenting influences across development individually contribute to internalizing and externalizing problems in children. The present study tests the combined contributions of genetic risk for psychopathology, prenatal environments (maternal drug use and internalizing symptoms), child cortisol at age 4.5 years, and overreactive parenting influences across childhood on 6-year-old children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. We used data from an adoption design that included 361 domestically adopted children and their biological and adopted parents prospectively followed from birth. Only parenting influences contributed (independently) to externalizing problems. However, genetic influences were indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through increased prenatal risk and subsequent morning cortisol), and parenting factors were both directly and indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through morning cortisol). Results suggest that prenatal maternal drug use/symptoms and children’s morning cortisol levels are mechanisms of genetic and environmental influences on internalizing problems, but not externalizing problems, in childhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-282
Number of pages15
JournalBehavior Genetics
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

parenting
Parenting
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
gene
childhood
Genes
adopted children
drug
genes
Mothers
drugs
Genetic Research
Psychopathology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Parents
Parturition
testing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Marceau, Kristine ; Laurent, Heidemarie K. ; Neiderhiser, Jenae M. ; Reiss, David ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Natsuaki, Misaki N. ; Fisher, Philip A. ; Leve, Leslie D. / Combined Influences of Genes, Prenatal Environment, Cortisol, and Parenting on the Development of Children’s Internalizing Versus Externalizing Problems. In: Behavior Genetics. 2015 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 268-282.
@article{a36910c1e7dc4480a6273eecf86d0cb6,
title = "Combined Influences of Genes, Prenatal Environment, Cortisol, and Parenting on the Development of Children’s Internalizing Versus Externalizing Problems",
abstract = "Research suggests that genetic, prenatal, endocrine, and parenting influences across development individually contribute to internalizing and externalizing problems in children. The present study tests the combined contributions of genetic risk for psychopathology, prenatal environments (maternal drug use and internalizing symptoms), child cortisol at age 4.5 years, and overreactive parenting influences across childhood on 6-year-old children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. We used data from an adoption design that included 361 domestically adopted children and their biological and adopted parents prospectively followed from birth. Only parenting influences contributed (independently) to externalizing problems. However, genetic influences were indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through increased prenatal risk and subsequent morning cortisol), and parenting factors were both directly and indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through morning cortisol). Results suggest that prenatal maternal drug use/symptoms and children’s morning cortisol levels are mechanisms of genetic and environmental influences on internalizing problems, but not externalizing problems, in childhood.",
author = "Kristine Marceau and Laurent, {Heidemarie K.} and Neiderhiser, {Jenae M.} and David Reiss and Shaw, {Daniel S.} and Natsuaki, {Misaki N.} and Fisher, {Philip A.} and Leve, {Leslie D.}",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10519-014-9689-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "268--282",
journal = "Behavior Genetics",
issn = "0001-8244",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

Combined Influences of Genes, Prenatal Environment, Cortisol, and Parenting on the Development of Children’s Internalizing Versus Externalizing Problems. / Marceau, Kristine; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Fisher, Philip A.; Leve, Leslie D.

In: Behavior Genetics, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. 268-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combined Influences of Genes, Prenatal Environment, Cortisol, and Parenting on the Development of Children’s Internalizing Versus Externalizing Problems

AU - Marceau, Kristine

AU - Laurent, Heidemarie K.

AU - Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

AU - Reiss, David

AU - Shaw, Daniel S.

AU - Natsuaki, Misaki N.

AU - Fisher, Philip A.

AU - Leve, Leslie D.

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - Research suggests that genetic, prenatal, endocrine, and parenting influences across development individually contribute to internalizing and externalizing problems in children. The present study tests the combined contributions of genetic risk for psychopathology, prenatal environments (maternal drug use and internalizing symptoms), child cortisol at age 4.5 years, and overreactive parenting influences across childhood on 6-year-old children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. We used data from an adoption design that included 361 domestically adopted children and their biological and adopted parents prospectively followed from birth. Only parenting influences contributed (independently) to externalizing problems. However, genetic influences were indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through increased prenatal risk and subsequent morning cortisol), and parenting factors were both directly and indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through morning cortisol). Results suggest that prenatal maternal drug use/symptoms and children’s morning cortisol levels are mechanisms of genetic and environmental influences on internalizing problems, but not externalizing problems, in childhood.

AB - Research suggests that genetic, prenatal, endocrine, and parenting influences across development individually contribute to internalizing and externalizing problems in children. The present study tests the combined contributions of genetic risk for psychopathology, prenatal environments (maternal drug use and internalizing symptoms), child cortisol at age 4.5 years, and overreactive parenting influences across childhood on 6-year-old children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. We used data from an adoption design that included 361 domestically adopted children and their biological and adopted parents prospectively followed from birth. Only parenting influences contributed (independently) to externalizing problems. However, genetic influences were indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through increased prenatal risk and subsequent morning cortisol), and parenting factors were both directly and indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through morning cortisol). Results suggest that prenatal maternal drug use/symptoms and children’s morning cortisol levels are mechanisms of genetic and environmental influences on internalizing problems, but not externalizing problems, in childhood.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937771312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937771312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10519-014-9689-z

DO - 10.1007/s10519-014-9689-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 25355319

AN - SCOPUS:84937771312

VL - 45

SP - 268

EP - 282

JO - Behavior Genetics

JF - Behavior Genetics

SN - 0001-8244

IS - 3

ER -