Combined Medical and Surgical Approach Improves Healing of Septic Perianal Crohn's Disease

Christine S. Choi, Arthur S. Berg, William Sangster, Kathleen M. Schieffer, Leonard R. Harris, Sue M. Deiling, Walter A. Koltun

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Abstract

Background Septic perianal Crohn's disease (SPCD) is a treatment challenge in spite of tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNF). Our aim was to define the success of SPCD management with a combined medical and surgical approach and to identify clinical and genetic factors predictive of healing. Study Design A retrospective chart review of patients with SPCD treated at the Penn State Milton S Hershey Medical Center was done. Primary end point was complete healing (ie normal clinical exam and no pain for at least 6 months). Genetic analysis of 185 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Crohn's disease was performed in 78 patients. Results One hundred and thirty-five episodes of SPCD were identified in 114 patients with a mean follow-up of 77 ± 7.4 months. Overall, 80 of 135 episodes healed (59.3%) and did not differ between those receiving anti-TNF and not (60.4% vs 56.8%). There appeared to be a consistent improved heal rate in each subcategory of surgically managed patients that received anti-TNF. Female sex was significantly predictive of healing in only those receiving anti-TNF agents (63.6% vs 25.0%; p = 0.0005). Twenty-two (19.3%) patients ultimately received a permanent diversion with either a total proctocolectomy or completion proctectomy. Multivariate analysis suggested several single nucleotide polymorphisms in Crohn's disease-associated genes to be possibly associated with healing, but lost significance after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions Overall, there is an approximate 60% rate of healing SPCD using a combined medical and surgical approach. About 20% of SPCD patients will require a permanent stoma. There were no clear genetic predictors of healing SPCD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)506-514.e1
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume223
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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