Combining ecological classification systems and conservation filters could facilitate the integration of wildlife and forest management

Eric K. Zenner, Jerilynn E. Peck, Kristen Brubaker, Benjamin Gamble, Carrie Gilbert, Daniel Heggenstaller, Jeanne Hickey, Kelly Sitch, Robbie Withington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ecosystem management demands simultaneous consideration and integration of ecosystem services in monitoring, planning, and management activities, but specialization has led to independently developed traditions in wildlife biology and management and forestry. We drew on the literature to explore the use of filters in wildlife conservation and ecological classification systems in forest management and to ask the question, "Can combining these tools improve our integration of wildlife and forest management?" Although each tool has been successfully applied independently, relatively few examples still exist for their combined use. We conclude that this approach has potential for enhancing research, monitoring, and management in areas beyond wildlife management, including forest health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-300
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Forestry
Volume108
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Plant Science

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