Comment: Applications of Robotics in the Clinical Laboratory

William J. Castellani, Frederick Van Lente, David Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The implementation of a robotic workstation in the clinical laboratory involves considerations and compromises common to any instrument design and development activity. The trade-off between speed and flexibility not only affects the way the instrument interacts with human operators and other devices (the ‘real-world interface’), but also places limitations on the adaptation of chemistries to the given instrument. Mechanical optimization for speed and reproducibility places restrictions on the imprecision of consumables. Attempts to adapt a robot to a constrained system may entail compromises that either degrades the theoretically-attainable quality of results, or requires human interaction to compensate for physical or mechanical limitations. The general considerations of function and workflow, programming and support, and reliability place practical limits on the implementation of robotic workstations in the clinical laboratory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-144
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Automatic Chemistry
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Clinical laboratories
Robotics
robotics
workstations
Workflow
programming
robots
Equipment and Supplies
constrictions
flexibility
Robots
chemistry
operators
optimization
interactions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Castellani, William J. ; Lente, Frederick Van ; Chou, David. / Comment : Applications of Robotics in the Clinical Laboratory. In: Journal of Automatic Chemistry. 1990 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 141-144.
@article{58c03f6305e84a7ba5026362a1cc3c43,
title = "Comment: Applications of Robotics in the Clinical Laboratory",
abstract = "The implementation of a robotic workstation in the clinical laboratory involves considerations and compromises common to any instrument design and development activity. The trade-off between speed and flexibility not only affects the way the instrument interacts with human operators and other devices (the ‘real-world interface’), but also places limitations on the adaptation of chemistries to the given instrument. Mechanical optimization for speed and reproducibility places restrictions on the imprecision of consumables. Attempts to adapt a robot to a constrained system may entail compromises that either degrades the theoretically-attainable quality of results, or requires human interaction to compensate for physical or mechanical limitations. The general considerations of function and workflow, programming and support, and reliability place practical limits on the implementation of robotic workstations in the clinical laboratory.",
author = "Castellani, {William J.} and Lente, {Frederick Van} and David Chou",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1155/S1463924690000177",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "141--144",
journal = "Journal of Analytical Methods in Chemistry",
issn = "2090-8865",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",
number = "4",

}

Comment : Applications of Robotics in the Clinical Laboratory. / Castellani, William J.; Lente, Frederick Van; Chou, David.

In: Journal of Automatic Chemistry, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.1990, p. 141-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comment

T2 - Applications of Robotics in the Clinical Laboratory

AU - Castellani, William J.

AU - Lente, Frederick Van

AU - Chou, David

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - The implementation of a robotic workstation in the clinical laboratory involves considerations and compromises common to any instrument design and development activity. The trade-off between speed and flexibility not only affects the way the instrument interacts with human operators and other devices (the ‘real-world interface’), but also places limitations on the adaptation of chemistries to the given instrument. Mechanical optimization for speed and reproducibility places restrictions on the imprecision of consumables. Attempts to adapt a robot to a constrained system may entail compromises that either degrades the theoretically-attainable quality of results, or requires human interaction to compensate for physical or mechanical limitations. The general considerations of function and workflow, programming and support, and reliability place practical limits on the implementation of robotic workstations in the clinical laboratory.

AB - The implementation of a robotic workstation in the clinical laboratory involves considerations and compromises common to any instrument design and development activity. The trade-off between speed and flexibility not only affects the way the instrument interacts with human operators and other devices (the ‘real-world interface’), but also places limitations on the adaptation of chemistries to the given instrument. Mechanical optimization for speed and reproducibility places restrictions on the imprecision of consumables. Attempts to adapt a robot to a constrained system may entail compromises that either degrades the theoretically-attainable quality of results, or requires human interaction to compensate for physical or mechanical limitations. The general considerations of function and workflow, programming and support, and reliability place practical limits on the implementation of robotic workstations in the clinical laboratory.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025103020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025103020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/S1463924690000177

DO - 10.1155/S1463924690000177

M3 - Article

C2 - 18925267

AN - SCOPUS:0025103020

VL - 12

SP - 141

EP - 144

JO - Journal of Analytical Methods in Chemistry

JF - Journal of Analytical Methods in Chemistry

SN - 2090-8865

IS - 4

ER -