Commercial database design vs. library terminology comprehension

Why do students print abstracts instead of full-text articles

Bonnie Brubaker Imler, Michelle Eichelberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When asked to print the full text of an article, many undergraduate college students print the abstract instead of the full text. This study seeks to determine the underlying cause(s) of this confusion. In this quantitative study, participants (n=40) performed five usability tasks to assess ease of use and usefulness of five commercial library databases and were surveyed on their understanding of library terminology. The study revealed that more than half of the students correctly defined the term 'Abstract' and over 75 percent understood "full text." However, only 25 percent of the students were able to successfully complete all five database tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-297
Number of pages14
JournalCollege and Research Libraries
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

technical language
comprehension
student
cause

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

@article{ebe73c344b3f4a9e9503eb67ecba1f4f,
title = "Commercial database design vs. library terminology comprehension: Why do students print abstracts instead of full-text articles",
abstract = "When asked to print the full text of an article, many undergraduate college students print the abstract instead of the full text. This study seeks to determine the underlying cause(s) of this confusion. In this quantitative study, participants (n=40) performed five usability tasks to assess ease of use and usefulness of five commercial library databases and were surveyed on their understanding of library terminology. The study revealed that more than half of the students correctly defined the term 'Abstract' and over 75 percent understood {"}full text.{"} However, only 25 percent of the students were able to successfully complete all five database tasks.",
author = "Imler, {Bonnie Brubaker} and Michelle Eichelberger",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5860/crl12-426",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "284--297",
journal = "College and Research Libraries",
issn = "0010-0870",
publisher = "Association of College and Research Libraries",
number = "3",

}

Commercial database design vs. library terminology comprehension : Why do students print abstracts instead of full-text articles. / Imler, Bonnie Brubaker; Eichelberger, Michelle.

In: College and Research Libraries, Vol. 75, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 284-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Commercial database design vs. library terminology comprehension

T2 - Why do students print abstracts instead of full-text articles

AU - Imler, Bonnie Brubaker

AU - Eichelberger, Michelle

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - When asked to print the full text of an article, many undergraduate college students print the abstract instead of the full text. This study seeks to determine the underlying cause(s) of this confusion. In this quantitative study, participants (n=40) performed five usability tasks to assess ease of use and usefulness of five commercial library databases and were surveyed on their understanding of library terminology. The study revealed that more than half of the students correctly defined the term 'Abstract' and over 75 percent understood "full text." However, only 25 percent of the students were able to successfully complete all five database tasks.

AB - When asked to print the full text of an article, many undergraduate college students print the abstract instead of the full text. This study seeks to determine the underlying cause(s) of this confusion. In this quantitative study, participants (n=40) performed five usability tasks to assess ease of use and usefulness of five commercial library databases and were surveyed on their understanding of library terminology. The study revealed that more than half of the students correctly defined the term 'Abstract' and over 75 percent understood "full text." However, only 25 percent of the students were able to successfully complete all five database tasks.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899694834&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899694834&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5860/crl12-426

DO - 10.5860/crl12-426

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 284

EP - 297

JO - College and Research Libraries

JF - College and Research Libraries

SN - 0010-0870

IS - 3

ER -