Communication, language and the institutionalised elderly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research describing the social world of elderly residents of nursing homes is organised in this paper into three levels of analysis: the institutional level, the relational level and the interactional level. The significance of each level is highlighted, with special attention being given to the interactional level of analysis and the study of language within the nursing home. Data gathered from semi-structured interviews with both elderly residents and nurse aides are presented and interpreted as evidence of interactional problems which may emerge in the resident-staff relationship. Implications and future prospects of incorporating the three levels of analysis into the study of the psychosocial well-being of nursing home residents are considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-165
Number of pages17
JournalAgeing and Society
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1991

Fingerprint

Nursing Homes
Language
nursing home
Communication
resident
communication
language
Nurses' Aides
Interviews
nurse
well-being
staff
Research
Residents
interview
evidence
Levels of Analysis
Interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Communication, language and the institutionalised elderly. / Nussbaum, Jon F.

In: Ageing and Society, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.06.1991, p. 149-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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