Comparative education research framed by neo-institutional theory

A review of diverse approaches and conflicting assumptions

Alexander W. Wiseman, M. Fernanda Astiz, David P. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rise in globalisation studies in comparative education places neo-institutional theory at the centre of many debates among comparative education researchers. However, uncertainty about how to interpret neo-institutional theory still persists among educational comparativists. With this uncertainty comes misinterpretation of its principles, variations and explanatory power. Two problematic misconceptions prevail: (1) the belief that the ‘world culture’ strand is the only version of neo-institutional theory applicable to comparative education research; and (2) the assumption that the global homogenisation of society, culture and schooling is a goal of researchers applying neo-institutional theory to comparative education phenomena. This article addresses these misconceptions, elucidating neo-institutional theory and its applicability to comparative education research. Our findings suggest that neo-institutional frameworks for comparative education research are useful, but that complementary approaches and methods are also necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-709
Number of pages22
JournalCompare
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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comparative education
uncertainty
globalization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Comparative education research framed by neo-institutional theory : A review of diverse approaches and conflicting assumptions. / Wiseman, Alexander W.; Astiz, M. Fernanda; Baker, David P.

In: Compare, Vol. 44, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 688-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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