Comparative effectiveness of six counselor verbal responses

Robert P. Ehrlich, Anthony Raymond D'Augelli, Steven J. Danish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined the effect of 6 counselor verbal responses on clients' verbal behavior and on their perceptions of counselors. The verbal responses were affect, coontent, influencing, advice, open question, and closed question responses. 90 female undergraduates were randomly assigned to 1 of the 6 treatments. Each participant played the role of client in a simulated helping interaction, and afterwards, they completed the Counselor Rating Form. Affect responses were found to be the most desirable from both the counselors' and clients' perspectives, and closed questions were least desirable. Content responses and open questions were also highly effective in eliciting desirable client behavior. Advice responses were rated highly by clients but were not effective in eliciting desirable client behavior. (24 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-398
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1979

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Verbal Behavior
Counselors
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Ehrlich, Robert P. ; D'Augelli, Anthony Raymond ; Danish, Steven J. / Comparative effectiveness of six counselor verbal responses. In: Journal of Counseling Psychology. 1979 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 390-398.
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Comparative effectiveness of six counselor verbal responses. / Ehrlich, Robert P.; D'Augelli, Anthony Raymond; Danish, Steven J.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 26, No. 5, 01.09.1979, p. 390-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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