Comparative physiological responses of normotensive and essentially hypertensive men to exercise in the heat

W. Larry Kenney, E. Kamon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six essentially hypertensive men (average resting arterial pressure of 150/97 mm Hg) and eight normotensive controls (average resting arterial pressure of 115/73 mm Hg) were tested during 1 h of dynamic leg exercise in a warm environment. The groups were well matched for age, {Mathematical expression} max, body surface area, weight, and body fat. Environmental conditions were 38‡ C dry-bulb, 28‡ C wet-bulb; exercise intensity was approximately 40% {Mathematical expression} max (85-90 W). There were no significant intergroup differences in core or mean skin temperatures, calculated heat exchange variables, heart, or sweat rates. Blood pressure differences between the groups were maintained (P<0.01). The hypertensive group responded with a significantly lower stroke index (P<0.01) and cardiac index (P<0.01), and a decreased slope of the rise in forearm blood flow (P<0.01) due to an higher vascular resistance (P<0.01). The combined heat load (M + R + C) presented was not sufficient to override the hypertensives' higher cutaneous vasoconstrictor tone. However, on a practical basis, the hypertensives were able to tolerate exercise in the heat as well as their normotensive counterparts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-201
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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Hot Temperature
Exercise
Arterial Pressure
Skin Pigmentation
Skin Temperature
Sweat
Body Surface Area
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Forearm
Vascular Resistance
Adipose Tissue
Leg
Stroke
Blood Pressure
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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