Comparing the sensory characteristics of doughnuts made with trans-fat-free Canola shortening, trans-fat-free palm shortening, and trans-fat vegetable/soybean shortening

Peter Lawrence Bordi, Jr., Kimberly S. Snyder, S. William Hessert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because of the adverse health effects associated with consuming trans-fats, foodservice companies continue to reduce/eliminate the amount of trans-fats used to prepare doughnuts and other foods. People eat doughnuts because they like the taste, however, meaning companies must reduce/eliminate trans-fats in a manner that has minimal impact on consumer preference. This study evaluated the sensory characteristics of doughnuts fried in three shortenings- one trans-fat and two trans-fat-free. Overall, the doughnuts prepared with trans-fat-free shortening compared favorably to those made using trans-fat shortening-a significant accomplishment with enormous implications for consumers and the industry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-72
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Culinary Science and Technology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2010

Fingerprint

doughnuts
plant fats
canola
Soybeans
shortenings
Vegetables
sensory properties
Fats
soybeans
lipids
food service
consumer preferences
Industry
adverse effects
industry
Food
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Because of the adverse health effects associated with consuming trans-fats, foodservice companies continue to reduce/eliminate the amount of trans-fats used to prepare doughnuts and other foods. People eat doughnuts because they like the taste, however, meaning companies must reduce/eliminate trans-fats in a manner that has minimal impact on consumer preference. This study evaluated the sensory characteristics of doughnuts fried in three shortenings- one trans-fat and two trans-fat-free. Overall, the doughnuts prepared with trans-fat-free shortening compared favorably to those made using trans-fat shortening-a significant accomplishment with enormous implications for consumers and the industry.",
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