Comparing the sensory characteristics of doughnuts made with trans-fat-free Canola shortening, trans-fat-free palm shortening, and trans-fat vegetable/soybean shortening

Peter Lawrence Bordi, Jr., Kimberly S. Snyder, S. William Hessert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Because of the adverse health effects associated with consuming trans-fats, foodservice companies continue to reduce/eliminate the amount of trans-fats used to prepare doughnuts and other foods. People eat doughnuts because they like the taste, however, meaning companies must reduce/eliminate trans-fats in a manner that has minimal impact on consumer preference. This study evaluated the sensory characteristics of doughnuts fried in three shortenings- one trans-fat and two trans-fat-free. Overall, the doughnuts prepared with trans-fat-free shortening compared favorably to those made using trans-fat shortening-a significant accomplishment with enormous implications for consumers and the industry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-72
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Culinary Science and Technology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science

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