Comparison of calculations and measurements of an electronically scanned circular array

James M. Stamm, Michael W. Jacobs, James K. Breakall

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    A circular array is modeled using two independent moment method codes. The array utilizes closely spaced high-gain end-fire elements to maximize the volumetric efficiency of an ellipsoidal enclosure, while minimizing the number of elements requiring control. An initial element was designed with an optimizer based upon the NEC4 engine; however, the use of moderately thick wires, wire-wire spacings of approximately one diameter, and non-trivial feeds required a wire/plate code for accurate element performance prediction. At the same time, efficient modeling of the entire array required a second code with a discrete body-of-revolution (DBOR) capability. Both electromagnetic codes were used in conjunction to arrive at a complete array design. With the exception of the highest frequency, where balun difficulties were plainly evident, correlation between predicted and measured results are very good.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages814-821
    Number of pages8
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
    Event16th Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics (ACES 2000) - Monterey, CA, USA
    Duration: Mar 20 2000Mar 24 2000

    Other

    Other16th Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics (ACES 2000)
    CityMonterey, CA, USA
    Period3/20/003/24/00

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Stamm, J. M., Jacobs, M. W., & Breakall, J. K. (2000). Comparison of calculations and measurements of an electronically scanned circular array. 814-821. Paper presented at 16th Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics (ACES 2000), Monterey, CA, USA, .