Comparison of individualized and non-specific video-prompts to teach daily living skills to students with autism spectrum disorders

Sarah Domire Monaco, Pamela S. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three elementary students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) participated in this study, which compared video self-prompting using individualized videos and video self-prompting using non-specific videos. Video self-prompting involves students controlling video-prompts, which show shortened video clips of someone performing steps of a target skill. The student then performs individual steps of the skill before proceeding to the next video clip. An adapted alternating treatments design was used to compare individualized and non-specific video-prompts in teaching six daily living skills. Improvements were noted for both the individualized and the non-specific video-prompts for all three students and all six skills. All three students required a slightly higher number of sessions to meet 100% correct using the non-specific video-prompts than the individualized video-prompts. One student was able to maintain the target skills 2 and 4 weeks post-intervention without the use of video-prompts. Limitations of the study, suggestions for future research, and implications for educators are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-392
Number of pages15
JournalEducation and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Volume53
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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autism
video
Students
student
Surgical Instruments
video clip
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Teaching
educator

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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