Comparison of total intravenous anesthesia using propofol and inhalational anesthesia using isoflurane for controlled hypotension in functional endoscopic sinus surgery

Saravanan P. Ankichetty, Manickam Ponniah, Verghese Cherian, Sarah Thomas, Kamal Kumar, L. Jeslin, K. Jeyasheela, Naveen Malhotra

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Abstract

Background: An important requirement during functional endoscopic sinus surgery is to maintain a clear operative field to improve visualization during surgery and to minimize complications. Materials and Methods: We compared total intravenous anesthesia using propofol with inhalational anesthesia using isoflurane for controlled hypotension in functional endoscopic sinus surgery. It was a prospective study in a tertiary hospital in India. Forty ASA physical status I and II adult patients (16-60 years) were randomly allocated to one of two parallel groups (isoflurane group, n = 20; propofol group, n = 20). The primary outcome was to know whether total intravenous anesthesia using propofol was superior to inhalational anesthesia using isoflurane for controlled hypotension. The secondary outcomes measured were intraoperative blood loss, duration of surgery, surgeon's opinion regarding the surgical field and the incidence of complications. Results: The mean (±SD) time to achieve the target mean blood pressure was 18 (±8) minutes in the isoflurane group and 16 (±7) minutes in the propofol group (P = 0.66). There was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.402) between these two groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss and operative field conditions (P = 0.34). Conclusions: Controlled hypotension can be achieved equally and effectively with both propofol and isoflurane. Total intravenous anesthesia using propofol offers no significant advantage over isoflurane-based anesthetic technique in terms of operative conditions and blood loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-332
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2011

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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