Compensatory Mechanisms in Congestive Heart Failure — The Role of the Peripheral Resistance Vessels

Robert Zelis, Dean T. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ONE of the principal characteristics of patients with congestive heart failure is the diminished response of cardiac output with physiologic stress.1 There are a number of circulatory mechanisms, both central and peripheral, by which the patient with heart failure compensates for this inability to augment cardiac output adequately. The central compensatory mechanisms include the use of the Frank-Starling principle, development of myocardial hypertrophy and increased sympathetic drive to the heart.2 Thus, the increased blood volume resulting from the renal retention of sodium and secondary aldosteronism leads to an increased ventricular filling pressure and the operation of the ventricle higher on.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)962-964
Number of pages3
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume282
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 23 1970

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Cardiac Output
Vascular Resistance
Heart Failure
Starlings
Hyperaldosteronism
Ventricular Pressure
Blood Volume
Hypertrophy
Sodium
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Compensatory Mechanisms in Congestive Heart Failure — The Role of the Peripheral Resistance Vessels",
abstract = "ONE of the principal characteristics of patients with congestive heart failure is the diminished response of cardiac output with physiologic stress.1 There are a number of circulatory mechanisms, both central and peripheral, by which the patient with heart failure compensates for this inability to augment cardiac output adequately. The central compensatory mechanisms include the use of the Frank-Starling principle, development of myocardial hypertrophy and increased sympathetic drive to the heart.2 Thus, the increased blood volume resulting from the renal retention of sodium and secondary aldosteronism leads to an increased ventricular filling pressure and the operation of the ventricle higher on.",
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Compensatory Mechanisms in Congestive Heart Failure — The Role of the Peripheral Resistance Vessels. / Zelis, Robert; Mason, Dean T.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 282, No. 17, 23.04.1970, p. 962-964.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Compensatory Mechanisms in Congestive Heart Failure — The Role of the Peripheral Resistance Vessels

AU - Zelis, Robert

AU - Mason, Dean T.

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N2 - ONE of the principal characteristics of patients with congestive heart failure is the diminished response of cardiac output with physiologic stress.1 There are a number of circulatory mechanisms, both central and peripheral, by which the patient with heart failure compensates for this inability to augment cardiac output adequately. The central compensatory mechanisms include the use of the Frank-Starling principle, development of myocardial hypertrophy and increased sympathetic drive to the heart.2 Thus, the increased blood volume resulting from the renal retention of sodium and secondary aldosteronism leads to an increased ventricular filling pressure and the operation of the ventricle higher on.

AB - ONE of the principal characteristics of patients with congestive heart failure is the diminished response of cardiac output with physiologic stress.1 There are a number of circulatory mechanisms, both central and peripheral, by which the patient with heart failure compensates for this inability to augment cardiac output adequately. The central compensatory mechanisms include the use of the Frank-Starling principle, development of myocardial hypertrophy and increased sympathetic drive to the heart.2 Thus, the increased blood volume resulting from the renal retention of sodium and secondary aldosteronism leads to an increased ventricular filling pressure and the operation of the ventricle higher on.

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