Complement receptor 1 polymorphisms associated with resistance to severe malaria in Kenya

Vandana Thathy, Jo Ann M. Moulds, Bernard Guyah, Walter Otieno, José A. Stoute

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41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: It has been hypothesized that the African alleles Sl2 and McCb of the Swain-Langley (Sl) and McCoy (McC) blood group antigens of the complement receptor 1 (CR1) may confer a survival advantage in the setting of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but this has not been demonstrated. Methods: To test this hypothesis, children in western Kenya with severe malaria-associated anaemia or cerebral malaria were matched to symptomatic uncomplicated malaria controls by age and gender. Swain-Langley and McCoy blood group alleles were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism and conditional logistic regression was carried out. Results: No significant association was found between the African alleles and severe malaria-associated anaemia. However, children with Sl2/2 genotype were less likely to have cerebral malaria (OR = 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.72, P = 0.02) than children with Sl1/1. In particular, individuals with Sl2/2 McCa/b genotype were less likely to have cerebral malaria (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.77, P = 0.02) than individuals with Sl1/1 McCa/a. Conclusion: These results support the hypothesis that the Sl2 allele and, possibly, the McCb allele evolved in the context of malaria transmission and that in certain combinations probably confer a survival advantage on these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number54
JournalMalaria journal
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 8 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

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