Complement receptor 1 polymorphisms associated with resistance to severe malaria in Kenya

Vandana Thathy, Jo Ann M. Moulds, Bernard Guyah, Walter Otieno, Jose Stoute

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It has been hypothesized that the African alleles Sl2 and McCb of the Swain-Langley (Sl) and McCoy (McC) blood group antigens of the complement receptor 1 (CR1) may confer a survival advantage in the setting of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but this has not been demonstrated. Methods: To test this hypothesis, children in western Kenya with severe malaria-associated anaemia or cerebral malaria were matched to symptomatic uncomplicated malaria controls by age and gender. Swain-Langley and McCoy blood group alleles were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism and conditional logistic regression was carried out. Results: No significant association was found between the African alleles and severe malaria-associated anaemia. However, children with Sl2/2 genotype were less likely to have cerebral malaria (OR = 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.72, P = 0.02) than children with Sl1/1. In particular, individuals with Sl2/2 McCa/b genotype were less likely to have cerebral malaria (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.77, P = 0.02) than individuals with Sl1/1 McCa/a. Conclusion: These results support the hypothesis that the Sl2 allele and, possibly, the McCb allele evolved in the context of malaria transmission and that in certain combinations probably confer a survival advantage on these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number54
JournalMalaria journal
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 8 2005

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Complement C1
Complement Receptors
Kenya
Malaria
Cerebral Malaria
Alleles
Blood Group Antigens
Anemia
Genotype
Antigen Receptors
Falciparum Malaria
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Logistic Models
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Thathy, Vandana ; Moulds, Jo Ann M. ; Guyah, Bernard ; Otieno, Walter ; Stoute, Jose. / Complement receptor 1 polymorphisms associated with resistance to severe malaria in Kenya. In: Malaria journal. 2005 ; Vol. 4.
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Complement receptor 1 polymorphisms associated with resistance to severe malaria in Kenya. / Thathy, Vandana; Moulds, Jo Ann M.; Guyah, Bernard; Otieno, Walter; Stoute, Jose.

In: Malaria journal, Vol. 4, 54, 08.11.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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